Author Archives: Rich Ross

Rich Ross

About Rich Ross

Richard Ross currently works as an Aquatic Biologist at the Steinhart Aquarium in the California Academy of Sciences, maintaining many exhibits including the 212,000 gallon Philippine Coral Reef. He has kept saltwater animals for over 25 years, and has worked in aquarium maintenance, retail, wholesale and has consulted for a coral farm/fish collecting station in the South Pacific. Richard enjoys all aspects of the aquarium hobby and is a regular author for trade publications, a frequent speaker at aquarium conferences and was a founder of one of the largest and most progressive reef clubs in Northern California, Bay Area Reefers. He is an avid underwater videographer and has been fortunate to scuba dive in a lot of places around the world. At home he maintains a 300 gallon reef system and a 250 gallon cephalopod/fish breeding system, and was one of the first people to close the life cycle of Sepia bandensis. When not doing all that stuff, he enjoys spending time with his patient wife, his incredible daughter and their menagerie of animals, both wet and dry.
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PIJAC – an organization we should all support

screen shot 2014 09 09 at 11 42 51 am PIJAC   an organization we should all supportMASNALogoR600 300x92 PIJAC   an organization we should all supportToday, the Aquatics Committee of the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council (PIJAC) sent a letter to Marine Aquarium Societys of North America (MASNA) detailing it’s mission and successes to date. I couldn’t be more happy – finally an organization with a clear message and call to action that we can all support, and by support, I mean give money too. Well, spread the word as well, but what is really needed to continue to represent the hobby/industry in regards to legislation, rule-making and litigation is the kind of science that PIJAC is supporting, and as we all know, science and the sharing of that science, takes money.  Even better, MASNA is offering to match 100% of the donations given through their PIJAC donation link – so go here and donate some coin. Thanks and kudos to the PIJAC Aquatics Committee for all their hard work up until this point, and thanks to MASNA for the donation matching campaign. Industry author Ret Talbot summed up the letter and the issues behind the letter very well in a piece called “PIJAC Goes Public”. Talbot writes,”The letter is straightforward, relatively concise and generally an accurate portrayal of the situation. Most important, it avoids oversimplification and data-poor incendiary statements; it redirects the dialog to data and science and away from the polarizing effects of unsubstantiated and false claims. It is to PIJAC’s credit they released this statement, which will help aquarists and trade leaders make informed, critical decisions concerning how they will respond to these and future ESA listings.” I urge you to read the entire piece, as well as the actual letter PIJAC sent to MASNA as the details are important. For years, people in the hobby and industry have wanted an organization that represents them in this arena, and now we have it, it is our responsibility to lend the PIJAC Aquatics Committee our support, so please share this information around, everywhere you can think of, because these the issues they are taking on are critical to the future of the hobby and to wild reefs. Please, get to it!… More:

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Amazing Sea Hares from Anilao Pier

Carissa1 Amazing Sea Hares from Anilao PierAnilao Pier, home to the notorious bobbit worm, is my favorite site in the Philippines for night diving. I first dove here in 2012, during my graduate studies at San Francisco State University and the California Academy of Sciences. The diversity of marine invertebrates here is astounding, especially with respect to sea slugs, snails, and anemones. I’m particularly interested in sea hares, a group of sea slugs in the order Anapsidea. They’re called sea hares thanks to the horn-like structures on their head, known as rhinophores, which allow them to sense their environment—and which happen to resemble rabbit ears. Like the nudibranchs they’re related to (same phylum, different order), sea slugs have evolved potent chemical defenses to deter predation, since they’re soft-bodied and possess either a reduced shell or no shell at all. On one of my night dives MORE: Amazing Sea Hares from Anilao PierMore:

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Return from Lubang

Lubang1 Return from LubangWell, we’ve just returned from Lubang Island, and I’ve never been to a more remote, more rustic place in the world. The boat ride we were told would take three hours ended up taking five, but the sea was calm and we had a beautiful ride out. We saw dolphins, jellies, and tons of flying fish. When we first pulled up at the port, there were probably 50 people who came out to look at us. I have no doubt we were the first Americans many of them had seen—kids were yelling, “Power boat! Look, a power boat!” and running over to check out our relatively modest, 15-foot whaler-type boat. As soon as we arrived, four of us took off in the power boat to scout for the dive locations for the next two days. We looked for rocky outcrops on the end of the island facing the drop-off into the South China Sea, and we used side-scan sonar to find rocky areas in the 200- to 350-foot-deep range. After a few stops, we found a spot to dive, so Elliott and I suited up and dropped into a dive site we named “The End of the World.” We did a (relatively) quick pass on the site—buzzing down to 300 feet on scooters and then taking our time coming back up—the total length of dive was 71 minutes, which is about as quick as you can do a dive like MORE: Return from LubangMore:

Posted in Fish, Invertebrates, Science | Leave a comment

We Brought an Entire Aquarium With Us (and Built a Fish-Sized Hyperbaric Chamber)

Rich aqSetup We Brought an Entire Aquarium With Us (and Built a Fish Sized Hyperbaric Chamber)When I tell people that we’re in the field collecting saltwater animals for display and research at the aquarium, most of them imagine that the actual catching is the hard part. In reality, the hard work starts after we collect the animal. Keeping animals healthy in the field—and then healthy while en route back to Manila for a 14-hour flight to their new home in Golden Gate Park—entails an entire slew of life-support equipment (LSS). We have that stuff at the Academy, obviously, but right now we’re out in the field. Where it’s too hot. Where there isn’t a store to buy what we need. Where we have to constantly battle a continually moving colony of fire ants that appeared right where we set up our equipment. Fortunately, all the pre-planning we did to prepare for this is paying off. Want the laundry-list of what came with us on the plane? Two 200-gallon inflatable kiddie pools (plus a third, just in case), 220-bolt air and water pumps, rolls of tubing, nets, containers, coral-holding devices, fish-holding cups, seeded biofilters, and an assortment of valves, glue, patch kits, rubber bands, cable ties, etc. We knew we’d need to keep MORE: We Brought an Entire Aquarium With Us (and Built a Fish-Sized Hyperbaric Chamber)More:

Posted in Corals, Equipment, Fish, Science, Seahorses | Leave a comment

“Like Something Out of a Nightmare”

Ross Bobbitt “Like Something Out of a Nightmare” There are two Academy groups currently in the Philippines for the 2014 Biodiversity Expedition: one from Research, and the other from the Aquarium. Though we’re staying at different locations, we collaborate when we can, like tonight. It all started with a 90-minute night dive at Anilao Pier to try to collect a Bobbitt worm—a creature that lives in the sand, has jaws like a bear trap, and might be several meters long. It shoots up with lightning speed to catch fish and other animals, yanking them down into the muck like something out of a nightmare. In the 1990s, Academy Senior Curator Terry Gosliner named the Bobbitt worm after Lorena Bobbitt (and her legendary attack on her husband), and Academy crews have been trying to collect this animal both for display and for our preserved collection ever since. One look at the photo shows you why catching this animal isn’t easy, but take a look at this video for an even better demonstration. Tonight’s effort was unsuccessful, though I did get my hand on one of the worms—yes, my hand. My wife is less than thrilled about these attempts, but she understands that we have to do what we have to do for science. More efforts are planned, and hopefully there will be success. Hopefully. After the worm hunt, there was a party—a party that started without MORE: “Like Something Out of a Nightmare”More:

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Ghost Pipefish in the Bag; Ever-elusive Bobbitt Worm … Still Elusive

Wolters1 Ghost Pipefish in the Bag; Ever elusive Bobbitt Worm … Still Elusive Greetings from Aniloa! After three and a half days of collecting in the field, we’ve amassed a nice collection of corals, invertebrates, and fish to ship back to the Academy—here’s a quick overview. The sites we’ve visited thus far include Twin Rocks, Devil’s Point, Bethlehem, Mapating Point, Dari Laut, Matu Point, and Anilao Pier, and we currently have 70 specimens on hand. They come from varying genera—Acropora, Fungia, Turbinaria, Tubastrea, Sinularia, and Sarcophyton—and they’re being kept in a temporary field aquarium set up at the Anilao Beach Club. (Rich Ross will be blogging about that setup later, so I won’t go into it here.) We were also able to acquire three snake anemones while on a night dive at Anilao Pier, and we’ll continue our quest for the elusive Bobbitt worm tonight during another night dive at the same location. Oh, and one more highlight: On this afternoon’s dive at Matu Point, Rich was able to collect a pair of ghost pipefish, which were way up there on our list of acquisitions for this expedition. With a couple more days of diving and collecting ahead, Aquarium Team One should be on track to collect most, if not all, of what we have set out for on this trip. —Seth Wolters, Assistant Curator for Steinhart Aquarium MORE: Ghost Pipefish in the Bag; Ever-elusive Bobbitt Worm … Still ElusiveMore:

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Three Men and No Guitar

RichRoss final1 Three Men and No GuitarChecking in for a 14-hour flight is always a good time. Checking in for a 14-hour flight with 11 items (three suitcases, five Action Packers, two bags, and Steinhart Director Bart Shepherd’s guitar) between three people is an amazingly good time. We started planning for this expedition in earnest five weeks ago, and considerable effort went into making sure our bags were under size and weight limits—a not insignificant task when equipment needed for the expedition includes Bobbit-worm catching devices, a series of newly designed hyperbaric chambers (for decompressing fish hand-collected below 300 feet), a ton of SCUBA and rebreather gear, and myriad other critical items needed to collect and ship live fish and corals from the Philippines back to Golden Gate Park. As it turned out, our packing efforts were worth the time we put into them, as all of our luggage was deemed to be within weight limits. Sadly, though, there was one piece of luggage that stayed in San Francisco because it couldn’t be hand-carried onto the plane, and we were scared it wouldn’t make it through the checked baggage experience. Oh guitar, we will miss you. The first aquarium team arrived safely at the Anilao Beach Club and enjoyed a delicious breakfast overlooking the Verde Island Passage. As soon as our luggage (which arrived in Manila in great shape, but is currently stuck in traffic) arrives on-site we’ll begin setting up scuba gear and animal holding. Then, the real work begins. —Rich Ross, Aquatic Biologist MORE: Three Men and No GuitarMore:

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Heart beating in developing Banggai eggs

 Not much to say about this, except it is pretty cool. For more about breeding these fish check this out – http://packedhead.net/2008/breeding-the-banggai-cardinalfish/… More:

Posted in Corals, Fish, Industry, Photography, Science | Leave a comment

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