Author Archives: Todd Gardner

Todd Gardner

About Todd Gardner

Todd Gardner is a professor of marine biology at Suffolk County Community College in Riverhead, NY. His life and his career have both been shaped by his passion for marine life and he has written numerous scientific and popular articles about his research and experiences collecting, keeping, and culturing marine organisms. Todd’s professional background includes work on a National Geographic documentary, commercial aquaculture at C-quest Hatchery in Puerto Rico, and an 11-year term at the Long Island Aquarium where he spent much of his time developing techniques for rearing marine fish larvae. To date he has raised more than 50 species. In 2013 Todd received the prestigious Aquarist of the Year Award from the Marine Aquarium Society of North America (MASNA). In his spare time, Todd dives, photographs marine life, runs marathons, and plays in a blues band.
Latest Posts

Long Island Collecting Log: An abundance of butterflies

ButterflyBucket
For me, one of the most interesting things about the appearance of the tropical strays on Long Island, is the sheer abundance of some of the species. The spotfin butterflyfish, Chaetodon ocellatus is a great example. I have lived in the Caribbean and I’ve spent a fair amount of time diving on Florida’s reefs. Although I probably encountered spotfin butterflies on the majority of dives within their native range, It was uncommon for me to see more than one or two at a time, and on any given dive, the total number rarely, if ever, got out of the single digits.… More:

Long Island Collecting Log: Brush with a stargazer

  Last week, after a successful seining trip in Shinnecock Bay, I lugged my dive gear out to the inlet to see if I could spot any tropical fishes among the rocks of the jetty. Although I didn’t encounter anything I would consider tropical, and the water was cold enough to give me brain freeze, I was treated to some pretty awesome sights. One of the highlights was this unusual sighting of a northern stargazer (Astroscopus guttatus) out for a swim.… More:

Long Island Collecting Log: The next wave has arrived

Spotfin and tangsLast week I reported on the arrival of the first tropical fishes of the year to appear in Long Island waters after a seining trip at Fire Island inlet turned up a filefish, groupers, and northern sennets. This week I am happy to announce that the next wave has arrived.… More:

Long Island Collecting Log: The tropicals are in

The northern sennet, a close relative of the great barracuda, is usually among the first warm-water species to appear on Long Island each year.

The northern sennet, a close relative of the great barracuda, is usually among the first warm-water species to appear on Long Island each year.

 After a long cold winter and amid disturbing reports that the North Atlantic may be entering a cool phase, I am very happy to report that the first tropical species of the year have made their appearance in Long Island waters.Yesterday, I was joined by an elite team of fish collectors… More:

Long Island Collecting Log: Deepwater squirrelfish makes a rare appearance

Sargocentron bullisis, the Deepwater Squirrelfish. Caught in Southampton, NY

Sargocentron bullisi, the Deepwater Squirrelfish. Caught in Southampton, NY

 Although it is not uncommon for the squirrelfish, Holocentrus adscensionis to show up in Long Island waters as a tropical stray, the deepwater squirrelfish, Sargocentron bullisi is a far less frequent visitor.… More:

Deep Red

Bigeye, Priacanthus arenatus. This specimen was found drifting in Sargassum weed.

Bigeye, Priacanthus arenatus. This specimen was found drifting in Sargassum weed.

 Red coloration and large eyes are typical of deep-water fishes.… More:

Drifters: A look at some Sargassum invertebrates

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA With a huge mass of Gulf Stream water much closer to shore than usual, we’ve had a rare opportunity here in New York to examine Sargassum communities.… More:

Too Cute! Baby Octopus Edition

IMG_8201sm I found this tiny octopus last week, clinging to a piece of sargassum weed 20 miles off the coast of Long Island, NY.… More:

Reefs.com is the world's leading destination for sustainable coral reef farming and the aquarium hobby. We offer a free open forum and reef related news and data to better educate aquarists and further our goals of sustainable reef management.