Category Archives: Corals

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Reef Threads MACNA Minicast, Day 2

reefthreads1 Reef Threads MACNA Minicast, Day 2 It’s day two and we have so much to talk about. Here’s a just some of what we’re seeing, hearing, and learning. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine More: Reef Threads MACNA Minicast, Day 2More:

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Reef Threads MACNA Minicast, Day 1

reefthreads1 Reef Threads MACNA Minicast, Day 1 It’s the first day of the Denver MACNA show and we’re reporting what we’re seeing and hearing. Hop you enjoy. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine More: Reef Threads MACNA Minicast, Day 1More:

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Techniques for Maintaining Calcium and Alkalinity in Reef Tanks

reef chemistry1 Techniques for Maintaining Calcium and Alkalinity in Reef TanksCalcium and alkalinity are vitally important chemical parameters in reef aquariums. They are used by stony corals to build their calcium carbonate skeletons. A lack of calcium and alkalinity in the water will inhibit the growth of reef-building corals and invertebrates, which will eventually lead to health problems. What is calcium? Calcium is one of the major ions in salt water. It is the fifth most common ion in salt water behind, chloride, sodium, sulfate, and magnesium. In most healthy reefs, the calcium level hovers around 425 parts per million (ppm). More: Techniques for Maintaining Calcium and Alkalinity in Reef TanksMore:

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Orchid Dottyback: Hardy, Peaceful, and Just Right for Reef Tanks

fridmani1 Orchid Dottyback: Hardy, Peaceful, and Just Right for Reef TanksCaptive breeding of marine fishes has been a boon to our hobby in any number of ways, one of which is democratizing access to formerly really pricy species such as the orchid dottyback (Pseudochromis fridmani). While I wouldn’t characterize the current market price of this Red Sea species as “cheap,” it’s definitely in the realm of affordable for most hobbyists—and it’s hardiness, ease of feeding, manageable adult size, reef-friendliness, and relatively peaceful disposition (as dottybacks go, that is) more than justify the modest outlay of cash for a specimen. Physical traits P. fridmani is a small (reaching only around 2½ inches), streamlined fish with reddish-purple overall coloration and blue scale margins. A dark stripe extends diagonally from the snout upward through the eye. This species’ appearance in aquariums can vary markedly depending on the lighting scheme. Feeding You’ll find this P More: Orchid Dottyback: Hardy, Peaceful, and Just Right for Reef TanksMore:

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Reef Threads Podcast #195

reefthreads1 Reef Threads Podcast #195 A tang with attitude.This week’s podcast topics include MACNA, gluing frags, sea smells, frag tanks as displays, and buying high-end equipment. We hope you enjoy it and look forward to meeting people at MACNA and sharing what we see and hear with those who can’t attend. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine More: Reef Threads Podcast #195More:

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Lower Keys Coral Bleaching Report (August 22, 2014)

600stag Lower Keys Coral Bleaching Report (August 22, 2014)
Having been preoccupied with the Miami Coral Rescue Mission this summer, we finally made our first excursion to the Lower Keys this summer on Friday August 22. Sadly, we found that a distressingly high percentage of corals living on the reefs in Hawk Channel are severely bleached. Most of the staghorn corals that we saw were severely bleached or actively dying, though there were a few hardy exceptions. Nearly all of the brain corals were bone white. All over the reef we observed an unhealthy mix of cyanobacteria and algae proliferating on previously dead coral skeletons. Even the normally hardy gorgonians, corallimorphs, and zoanthids showed significant bleaching on all three patch reefs we checked. The water temperature was an uncomfortable 89 degrees on the bottom. Without strong winds or storms to More: Lower Keys Coral Bleaching Report (August 22, 2014)More:

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Florida’s Reefs Go Digital

 I’ve written about it before here, but Google Map, thanks to Catlin Seaview Survey, is coming to an underwater reef near you. Eventually, our reefs will be documented in the same way as our streets are. This is a remarkable feet in being able to capture and study the health of our Ocean’s reef in a level that was not achievable before this technology. Up until now, the camera’s have focused on underwater reefs outside the United States. I am happy to say that a place near to my heart, the Florida Keys, will be the first American Reef to be photographed and available for underwater viewing. MOREMore:

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BP Oil Spill Continues to Destroy Marine Life

The deepwater Horizon (BP) oil spill of 2010 has largely been written off by the media and its perpetrators as “dissipated” or “contained,” yet the affects of releasing millions of gallons of oil into the sea are still wide reaching, says a team of researchers from Penn State University. Charles Fisher, professor of biology at Penn State University framed the issue stating: “The footprint of the impact of the spill on coral communities is both deeper and wider than previous data indicated. “This study very clearly shows that multiple coral communities, up to 22 kilometers from the spill site and at depths over 1800 meters, were impacted by the spill.” Using a remote operated vehicle (ROV) Fisher and his team were able to capture high resolution photo’s of coral communities, finding that the oil had affected marine life further than one had expected from the spill site. tfisher mc297 2 7 2014 BP Oil Spill Continues to Destroy Marine Life “We were looking for coral communities at depths of over 1000 meters that are often smaller than the size of a tennis court,” added Fisher.“We needed high-resolution images of the coral colonies that are scattered across these communities and that range in size from a small houseplant to a small shrub. With the cameras on board the ROV we were able to collect beautiful, high-resolution images of the corals,” said Fisher. “When we compared these images with our example of known oil damage, all the signs were present providing clear evidence in two of the newly discovered coral communities of the impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.” Read more here.  … More:

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