Category Archives: Seahorses

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Beautiful New Species of Weedy Sea Dragon Discovered

Photo by Josefin Stiller , Nerida G. Wilson , Greg W. Rouse. CC by 4.0.

Photo by Josefin Stiller , Nerida G. Wilson , Greg W. Rouse. CC by 4.0.

 Syngnathid fish fans have a new species to fawn over, according to a recent article in Scientific American Magazine. Until now, only two species of seadragon were known, the leafy and weedy seadragons. No new seadragon species has been discovered in 150 years. This newest addition to the small group, the aptly-named ruby seadragon, was uncovered by a trawler during a routine biodiversity survey by the University of Western Australia’s Marine Futures project in 2007. It was a happy surprise indeed. It is not only a very strange and attractive animal, but is decidedly quite… More:

Weedy Seadragons Available to Hobbyists

reefs.comSeadragonColdwater Marine Aquatics is bringing in captive raised weedy seadragons (Phyllipteryx taeniolatus) available to the masses. For me this news is akin to the first time I heard Borbonius anthias coming into the industry after drooling over their pictures for years. I had the pleasure of meeting the C.M.A. crew at MACNA Denver last year. I can tell you that these guys are incredibly knowledgeable regarding their niche in the industry, seemingly offering only the healthiest animals all around. I asked C.M.A. regarding the rearing technique and they replied with, “Berried adult males are collected annually and the young are hatched out and raised in captivity.”… More:

How To Pick Your First Seahorse: 12 Common Seahorse Species Explored

Any number of species of seahorses can be suitable for the right aquarium. Left to right: Hippocampus erectus, Hippocampus barbouri, Hippocampus reidi I’m often asked which species of seahorse aquarists should get for their first aquarium. This question may sound simple enough, but different species behave differently and have varying levels of care required. I’ve put together a list of the most commonly available species, their difficulty level and some additional notes.

Marine Fish Compatibility Concerns You Might Not Have Considered

Fish swimming overhead can make jawfish quite nervousWhen we think of compatibility problems between marine fish, what usually comes to mind is one specimen behaving outright aggressively toward another with the underlying motive of establishing territorial dominance or acquiring a meal. But sometimes incompatibility among fish has less to do with overt aggression or hungriness than, shall we say, differing “piscinalities.” Here are a few examples to illustrate my point: Is that a predator overhead? In some cases, pelagic fish can keep bottom-dwelling tankmates in a perpetual state of anxiety despite having no interest whatsoever in their doings. I’ve observed this in jawfish that share a tank with larger, open-swimming species that present no real threat to them, such as tangs and plankton-feeding triggers (e.g., Xanthichthys spp.). In this circumstance, a jawfish will tend to remain perpetually concealed in its burrow—with maybe just its eyes and mouth visible—rather than emerge and hover over it. And who can blame the jawfish? For burrowing species, danger usually comes from above, and they have to decided in a fraction of a second—based on the suspect’s body shape and movement—whether something passing overhead poses a threat or not

Opinion: Selling Baby Seahorses Is Wrong

Seahorse baby being sold far to young in a listing on eBay. It happens every so often. Someone discovers just how easily seahorses breed, but can’t raise the babies, or discover the expense and time it takes to raise seahorses and so they decide they can sell the seahorse fry and make some money doing it. Unfortunately, it’s a mistake and it ends badly for everyone but the seller. To understand why selling seahorse fry is wrong, we need to look at what causes this situation. Seahorses breed extremely easily

Whoa There, Daddy! I’m So Happy Humans Don’t Give Birth Like This

 I’m pretty terrified to have just one baby, but HUNDREDS? Take a looksie and this incredible video of a seahorse bursting hundreds of tiny little seahorse babies out of his robust pouch. This video is old news, 2009, but it’s the first time I’ve caught a glimpse of it, so I felt compelled to share in case some of you reef lovers missed it as well. For those of you who have seen it, well, maybe you want to revisit it in all of it’s baby seahorse glory. Props to seahorse dads, those guys are troopers.… More:

Fish Health Through Slime

Copperband Butterflyfish (C. rostratus) and Yellow Multibanded Pipefish (D. pessuliferus)Fish diseases—they are the meat of fish forums and the subject that takes up the most ink (or whatever causes words to form on a computer screen), so for today’s post, I am going to discuss fish immunity in relation to fish slime. Fish, like every organism, have an immune system that is specifically designed to function in the environment they live in, using as its source of energy the food that the creature is able to acquire through its intake devices, or mouth parts. The immune system is one of three parts of a fish that needs to be fueled to keep the fish operating at peak efficiency. The other two parts are growth and reproduction. If fish don’t take in enough food or get the wrong types of food, there will be less energy to fuel those systems properly and one or all will suffer.

Keeping “Difficult” Marine Fish

There are no real “difficult” fish; they survive just fine in the sea before someone comes along and collects them. They know what they need, and if we studied them in the sea, we would also know what they need, and it isn’t always about food (though most of the time, it is). There is a reason different fish come from different places—why Moorish idols come from the South Pacific and not Coney Island, why mandarins come from the Philippines and not Bayonne, New Jersey. I have spent time underwater with most of the fish I have ever kept, and I learned more from swimming a few minutes with them than from all the articles I ever read about them. Eating doesn’t equal thriving We as aquarists have a large list of fish that some consider difficult. I say the fish are not difficult but that the aquarist is either lazy or just doesn’t know what that fish is supposed to eat. Not all fish will thrive on “normal” aquarium fare. Many will eat it, but eating something doesn’t always equate with thriving

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