Category Archives: Tanks

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One Tough Goldfish

goldfish-800x351 Here’s a story of feeder goldfish that beat the odds. Seven years ago, at Shima Marineland in Japan, a small goldfish was thrown into a tank, intended as food for a hungry Arapaima. In case you didn’t know it, Arapaima are among the world’s largest freshwater fish, growing over 10 feet long and weighing over 400 pounds. The little goldfish managed to escape the hungry mouth of the Arapaima and ended up in the aquariums filter system. Where it lived for seven years eating detritus and other bits. During a recent filter cleaning, an aquarist was shocked to find the goldfish, now ten inches long, alive and well in the filter. The fish showed no signs of injury, however, it was a little pale, due to the years living in darkness. Now the goldish has turned into a bit of a celebrity and has its own display tank in the aquarium. MOREMore:

NASA Tests Under Ice Rover At California Science Center Aquairum

BRUIEOn June 24, 2015, NASA tested its Buoyant Rover for Under Ice Exploration (BRUIE) at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. The BRUIE was placed at 24 feet underwater on the bottom of the 188,000 gallon tank. The device was designed at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. The purpose of the rover is to study the Arctic and Antarctica and is meant for travel under the ice shelf of an icy world.… More:

Reefing from Afar, Part 4: The Wong Solution

The last article discussed some of the quick and simple ways to take care of your reef while being away for just a short period of time. Due to my work responsibilities, which require travel around the world for two- to three-week periods at a time, I need as much automation as possible and confidence in the solutions I choose.Here’s a high level overview of my system. I currently have a 365-gallon system made up of three display tanks (125 reef ready, 90 reef ready, 80 reef ready rimless), a 40 breeder refugium, and an All-Glass Megaflow 4 sump. Goals I have been in the hobby for over 25 years, and starting in 2006, I decided I wanted to tackle hard corals more. I worked in an LFS growing up and read every book that existed at the time. Before long, I realized it is very difficult to have a truly successful “mixed” reef and to satisfy every requirement for softies, LPS, SPS, and fish all in a single tank.

Neptune Systems Par Monitoring Kit

neptune systems PMK
Neptune Systems is pleased to announce that it will begin shipping its new Par Monitoring Kit, priced at $299.95, to North America next month. For more information, go to: https://www.neptunesystems.com/pmk/More:

Recall Of Aquarium Heaters


Top Fin Aquarium heaters, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, are on now on recall due to possible fire or electrical hazard to consumers. The heaters were sold at Petsmart from August 2014 to April 2015. The models include 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250 watt aquarium heaters. The company has 13 reports of incidents so far, including fire, four reports of electrical shock and multiple reports of electrical shortage. Petsmart is giving consumers a full refund for any returned units purchased at the store. MOREMore:

Tuna Added Back to Tokyo Sea Life Park Exhibit

tuna Keeping Tuna alive in captivity is extremely difficult and a task that only a handful of public aquariums around the world are able to do. Tokyo Sea Life Park was among the pioneers in displaying tuna in aquariums. Last year, sadly 160 tuna died without a known cause. By December of 2014, there was just one tuna left in the Aquariums famous 2000 gallon, donut shaped tank. The cause of the massive tuna deaths remains unknown. The Aquarium has been slowly adding different species back to the tank, to see how they did. So far, none of the fish which have been added to tank have suffered any known ailments. Therefore, the aquarium added the 80 tuna back to the tank and reopened it to the public. Hopefully the addition of the tuna far just as well, and the tank can go back to being a healthy habitat for the tuna. MOREMore:

Wife Swapping: Coral Style

It’s long been a theory of mine that corals exchange zooxanthellae within our aquariums to combat environmental stressors, and a new study proves this theory to be true in controlled systems as well as in the wild. The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science led the study, which simulated ocean-acidification in controlled tank environments. “Since ‘symbiont shuffling’ occurs in only some cases, we wanted to understand what drives this process and whether it could help corals adjust to climate change,” said Ross Cunning, lead author of the study. Researchers then allowed150604100915_1_900x600 these specimens to recover in different temperatures to gauge which clades of zooxanthellae they adopted, and with a firm theory here, Cunning suggests temperature could be a controlling factor when it comes how and what symbionts are exchanged: “We discovered that partner switching in Caribbean star corals is dependent upon the severity of the bleaching event and the temperature during recovery.” Two similar studies were also conducted in the Coral Reef Futures lab at UM. “Together, these studies suggest that that the rate of warming, timing between bleaching events, and severity of each bleaching event, will play an important role in determining coral survivorship. We need to better understand these changes in order to accurately predict coral reef futures.” add’s Andrew Baker, UM Rosenstiel School associate professor of marine biology and ecology at UM.  Read more here!… More:

Google Maps Underwater Street View Imagery Adds 40 New Locations

reefsIn today’s day and age, there is not much we cant do from behind our computer screens. You can see the whole world at the stroke of a key. Now you can see the underwater world as well. Google Street View allows you to go all over the world, from the comfort of your couch. You can now see some of the most amazing coral reefs in the world. Recently, they added 40 new locations. Google Maps has joined forces with XL Catlin Seaview Survey, NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the Chagos Conservation Trust to release Street View imagery of more than 40 underwater spots around the World. Divers take SVII cameras on their dives to catch just amazingly breathtaking footage. Some of the locations you can watch include  Bali, the Cook Islands, the Bahamas and the Great Barrier Reefs. Google is focused on conservation and awareness.By adding imagery which shows the state and health of our coral reefs now, we can be more aware of the devastating effect of human impact, like global warming, climate change, over fishing and pollution, just to name a few, on our reefs.  MOREMore:

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