Category Archives: Tanks

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Renovated Toledo Aquarium Ready For Grand Opening

toledo zooAfter two and half years of waiting, the renovated Toledo Aquarium will be opening on March 27, 2015.  Nearly 26 Million dollars was spent in the process. When the aquarium was closed for renovations, it held a respectable 46,000 gallons. Today it holds a whopping 178,000 gallons and includes interactive exhibits for visitors, like the Touch Tank and Ocean Lab. The largest exhibit, the reef tank, has gone from 7600 gallons to 90,000 gallons. This amazing transformation inside the aquarium, has not effected the exterior of this historic 1939 Works Progress Administration (WPA) building.… More:

Blotched/Borbonius Anthia Care Info

MY FB: https://www.facebook.com/coralfish12g The Borbonius Anthia is most commonly referred to as a blotched Anthia and it is one of the most prized of all reef fish. Because of its unique pink and yellow coloration, the Blotched Anthias has become very popular. Since it is a deep water Anthias, it requires a slightly lower temperate tank. They max out at about 6 inches in full adult form, so they should stay in tanks larger than 90 gallons. Lots of live rock should be in your tank for Blotched Anthias to thrive. The rock will provide lots of cover from lighting and areas to hide if spooked. Blotched Anthias should be fed multiple times per day with a variety of meaty foods such as mysis and brine shrimp. It can be somewhat aggressive so be sure that your tank is ready for it if you are willing drop the $300 dollar price tag that this brilliant fish usually comes with! The video and pics used in this CoralFish12g video are Henry Ludywidjaja's and special thank goes out to him!

Reef Threads Podcast #221


Inexpensive corals don’t deserve second-class care.

It’s podcast time again. In this week’s show we talk about Rod’s Food, water testing, the Port of Miami dredging disaster, Michael Paletta’s article about hobby costs, and Christine’s milk-filter-sock experiments. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine

Sponsor: Rod’s Food
Rod’s Food website

Port of Miami reef destruction
Despite Protections, Miami Port Project Smothers Coral Reef in Silt, Lizette Alvarez, The New York Times, March 7

Hobby too expensive?
Pros and Cons of the Reef Aquarium Hobby Being So Expensive, Michael Paletta, Reef Builders

Fish Bowls v Fish Tanks For Goldfish

golsfish Nobuaki Okamoto, also known as ‘Dr. Goldfish’, has written a book on how to enjoy keeping goldfish in bowls. The book aims to bring goldfish into closer contact with their owners and advocates for the use of fish bowls instead of fish tanks. Okamoto states:“What has distressed me is that goldfish have simply become an object of viewing through glass tanks. That distances fish from humans.” He recommends using bowls which one would typically use for serving Japanese noodles. His aim is to cultivate the same type of relationships which owners have with their cats or dogs.… More:

Favia and Favites Brain Corals

Favia and Favites Brain Corals This video is all about Favia and Favites, two of the most common types of brain corals found in the reef keeping hobby. The care requirements for Favia and Favites are fairly straight forward.... From: Tidal Gardens Inc. Views: 21 12 ratingsTime: 03:27 More in Pets & Animals

Picture of the Week, Green Hammer Coral

Stop, it’s hammer time. Cheesy throwbacks to the 80s aside, the hammer coral is a staple in many reef tanks much like MC Hammer’s song was a permanent fixture in many a Sony Walkman. Getting past all of this nostalgia, hammer corals offer the best of both worlds for corals. On one hand, they have a hard skeleton, but on the other they are adorned with flowy, fleshy tissue that draws in those seeking a little more movement in the water.

Reef Threads Podcast #220


Stable water parameters make for healthy corals. Are you testing your water?

Craig Bingman leaves no stone unturned this week in our in-depth discussion about water testing. It’s a terrific show packed with information about a critical component of reef keeping. Don’t miss it. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine

Sponsor: Rod’s Food
Rod’s Food website

Bubble-Tip Anemone Safety Tips

Nippy tankmates are one reason a bubble-tip anemone may start to roamThe bubble-tip anemone (Entacmaea quadricolor), or BTA, is justifiably popular in the marine aquarium hobby, being relatively hardy and easy to keep as anemones go as well as being a suitable host anemone for many clownfish species. But to horribly misquote legendary singer Dion DiMucci, “it’s the type of nem that likes to roam around”—particularly when it’s getting settled into a new system or decides it’s unhappy with its placement in an established one. The problem with an anemone going parading around its aquarium is that anytime it does so, it has the potential of blundering into equipment or other sessile invertebrates with potentially injurious (or even fatal) consequences. Thus, any system housing a BTA must be designed or modified to reduce the risk of accidental injury or harmful interspecific encounters.Here are several important factors to consider when BTA-proofing your tank: Crowded reef tanks aren’t ideal for BTAs People do keep BTAs in reef systems among various corals and other sessile invertebrates. However, as alluded above, this can prove problematic if the anemone goes roaming, as it may sting or be stung by any inverts it encounters in its travels (though not all corals are equally sensitive to the sting of a BTA and vice versa). Not to mention, problems with allelopathy (chemical warfare) among inverts tend to be much greater in mixed reefs. The best housing for a BTA is a good-sized system dedicated specifically to its needs. (If you’ve had long-term success keeping a BTA in a mixed reef, we’d love to hear how you managed it in the comment section below.) Pumps and powerheads are problematic Submersible pumps and powerheads are among the biggest offenders when it comes to injuring/killing wandering nems, so the intakes of these devices must be screened off with sponge, foam, or a similar material

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