Category Archives: Tanks

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Reef Threads Podcast #198

reefthreads1 Reef Threads Podcast #198

We’re back because we can’t stay away. This week we talk about Gary’s clam-eating copper band, goldfish brain surgery, Florida lion fish, natural seawater, green reefs, Randy Holmes-Farley, and Reef2Reef. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine More: Reef Threads Podcast #198

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Posted in Corals, Equipment, Fish, MACNA, Opinion, Photography, Podcast, Science, Tanks, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

GHL Mitras Lightbar Announced in Smaller Sizes and More Colors

517cMitras Lightbar GHL Mitras Lightbar Announced in Smaller Sizes and More ColorsGHL is updating their Mitras Lightbar for 2014 by offering them up in one brand new color configuration and two new sizes. Where the first generation of the Lightbar saw its smallest fixture tipping the scales at roughly 60 cm in length, or just under two feet, the new nano models will be suited for 40 or 50 cm aquariums. This is a good move to hit those smaller desktop nano aquariums that are all the rage these days, and nano owners could certainly appreciate the access to this high end LED striplight.As for the new color, the Mitras LED striplight will now be available in a deep actinic. Prior to this release, the Lightbar was only available in a daylight (freshwater), actinic (saltwater), and an ocean blue (mix of fresh and salt) configuration. This new color offers up the deep blue that has become synonymous with reef aquaria and it gives users more options for color blending and bolstering coral coloration.The Mitras Lightbar fixtures for 40 and 50 cm nano tanks are currently available in the GHL webshop, and the deep actinic models will become available in mid-October.Features common to all models:Selected high-power-LEDs of Cree MORE: GHL Mitras Lightbar Announced in Smaller Sizes and More ColorsMore:

Posted in Conservation, Corals, DIY, Equipment, Events, Fish, Industry, MACNA, Photography, Science, Tanks, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Elephant Aquarium In Switzerland?!

 The Zurich Zoo in Switzerland has a new exhibit, of the likes I have never seen before. The Kaeng Krachen Elephant park features 6 ‘aquariums’ or water basins for the elephants to swim in. The exhibit is described as ‘the most magical thing you will ever see’ and the exhibits are intended to reflect the natural environment of Asian elephants and improve the health of Zoo Elephants. This is definitely not your traditional aquarium, and certainty not one I would like to clean. MOREMore:

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Let Your Fish Roam Free

use this Let Your Fish Roam FreeThe ‘Abovemarine’ is a vehicle that allows your fish to roam free. Developed by South African Adam Ben-Dror, it is powered by ‘Omniwheels’ and uses camera technology, which allows the fish freedom to be able to navigate surroundings outside his or her fish tank. Once the fish is inside the device, the vehicle moves with the fish. If it appears your beloved beta fish is going to collide, say for example with your rumba, all that your fish needs to do is to swim backwards, and the vehicle will stop.… More:

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Reef Threads Podcast #197

reefthreads1 Reef Threads Podcast #197

It’s a new week and time for a new podcast. This week we talk about Sanjay’s notification trick, Reefs.com, blogs, the MACNA banquet, Archerfish skill, and skeptical animal selection. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine More: Reef Threads Podcast #197

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Posted in Corals, Equipment, Fish, MACNA, Opinion, Photography, Podcast, Science, Tanks, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

My Marine Aquarium Motto: Be Prepared!

be prepared My Marine Aquarium Motto: Be Prepared!I don’t know about you guys, but I like to be prepared for everything, not just for eventualities related to my marine tank, but for everything in life, as I don’t like surprises. Okay, I like some surprises, like once a busload of Miss Universe contestants stopped in front of my workplace and I was able to stare…I mean stay…there all day. Of course we can’t plan for everything, but we can plan for the things that already happened to us because they will most likely happen again. If your pump, skimmer, sump, or bathtub leaks once, there is nothing you can do about it, but if it leaks a second time, it is your fault because you should have planned for it to leak again. That squishy feeling About 15 years ago, I came down the stairs to my finished basement where my reef is and as soon as my foot touched the floor, which is covered in carpet, I heard that dreadful squishing sound and knew immediately that something in the tank leaked. It was my skimmer, which is a five-foot DIY model and is bolted to the back of my tank. If I had not been home, the entire tank would have emptied onto the floor. Now, my wife goes to the gym every day, so she can probably take me in a fair fight. She is a fanatic housekeeper and even washes the light bulbs, so you can imagine how she reacted to 25 gallons of salt water on the newish carpet More: My Marine Aquarium Motto: Be Prepared!More:

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Neptune Systems WAV Offers “Extreme” Flow and Controllability

3be0Neptune Systems WAV Neptune Systems WAV Offers “Extreme” Flow and ControllabilityNeptune Systems has been feverishly adding new accessories to their Apex controller over the last couple of years, and they’ve finally debuted their very own water pump. Called the WAV, this new system offers extreme water flow and it comes with a mountain of features and interesting selling points that could give some of the long established pumps a good run for their money. The pump is smaller than numerous other powerheads on the market, yet it cranks out over 3200 gallons per hour, all of which is under full Apex control. But we will hit more on that below. Like most pumps, the WAV attaches the wall of the aquarium via strong magnets, though these are are capable of handling tanks with glass or acrylic up to 3/4″ thick. The magnet mount also allows the WAV to vertically pivot +/- 20 degrees and rotate a full 360, letting the flow hit specific areas within the tank.In terms of controlability, the pump is built and designed to be used seamlessly with the Apex controller, and Neptune Systems even gave the WAV its own module, called the 1LINK. There are numerous flow settings through the controller, and the flow rates can be monitored through the Apex Fusion dashboard just like you would water temperature or pH. All in all, there are 8 pre-built flow programs (Constant, Mavericks, Lagoon, Pulse, Huntington, Rincon, Trestles, and Doheny), and users can program the pump to operate under any one of these modes at any time of the day. In addition to controlling the pumps, users will also be able to monitor each and every one that is plugged into the system. MORE: Neptune Systems WAV Offers “Extreme” Flow and ControllabilityMore:

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Clearing the Air on Ozone: Part 3

ozone3 1 Clearing the Air on Ozone: Part 3In the first two parts of this series, we talked about how ozone can function as a powerful tool in keeping your reef aquarium water very clear, how it can boost your skimmer’s ability to remove waste from the water column by breaking down the larger molecules, and how using ozone can be as simple as blowing the gas into your skimmer or injecting it into a dedicated reactor and carbon media reactor. This final installment will focus on how to keep yourself and your aquarium inhabitants safe while using ozone. Regardless of how you choose to administer your ozone, safety has to be your number one concern. Too much ozone in the tank will harm—or even kill—your invertebrates and fish. Too much ozone released into the room air can irritate a healthy adult’s lungs and is even more dangerous to anyone with lung-health issues. Keeping your livestock safe To keep their aquarium inhabitants safe, most keepers use an Oxidation/Reduction Potential (ORP) meter coupled with a controller that will switch the generator off when the ORP reaches a certain level. 300 mV is commonly considered to be a safe yet effective ORP level for the home aquarium. A controller uses the meter reading to shut the generator off when the water reaches the 300mV level or whatever level you may opt to use. Experts warn against ORP levels beyond 450 mV, as that level has been shown to cause major damage to aquarium systems. More: Clearing the Air on Ozone: Part 3More:

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