Category Archives: Tanks

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How Much Time Will You Invest in a Saltwater Aquarium?

time spent 300x169 How Much Time Will You Invest in a Saltwater Aquarium?When a non-hobbyist visitor is observing one of my marine aquariums for the first time, among the questions he or she almost invariably asks—along with inquiring about the expense and the level of difficulty relative to a freshwater tank—is something along the lines of, “How much time does it take to maintain that?” My usual answer to that question is, “Not as much as you might think.” For some reason, there’s a pervasive misconception out there that in order to maintain a marine aquarium successfully, the hobbyist must spend every waking moment feeding, cleaning, adjusting, testing, tweaking, jiggering, and kneeling before a statue of Neptune. All hobbies are time-consuming Don’t get me wrong; a successful marine aquarium does demand a certain time commitment—but then so does any other hobby or avocation worth pursuing. Whether you’re into golf, bowling, scuba diving, model ship building, or stamp collecting, you’re going to spend just as much time, if not more, developing and honing the necessary skills or simply participating. Modest daily time commitment So what sort of time commitment are we talking here? An hour a day? Two hours? Once a marine aquarium is established, the actual day-to-day commitment can be fairly modest More: How Much Time Will You Invest in a Saltwater Aquarium?More:

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A New Use For An Old Fish Tank

paint 2 A New Use For An Old Fish Tank Ever wonder what you could do with an old fish tank you weren’t using anymore? How about make some amazing art? Artist Kim Keever, a former NASA engineer, is creating amazing art using paint and fish tanks.… More:

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Yellow Tang Research at the Oceanic Institute – Making Exciting Progress

OI+yellow+tang+series+b Yellow Tang Research at the Oceanic Institute – Making Exciting ProgressResearch on culturing yellow tangs began at the Oceanic Institute (OI) back in 2001 around the same time as initial, exciting breakthroughs were achieved with dwarf angelfish (by OI and others like Frank Baensch and Karen Brittain). It seemed, back then, that we were just around the corner from some major steps forward with the culture of previously thought “impossible to rear” species. Indeed, there has been incredible progress with the culture of marine ornamentals since that time. However, yellow tang have proven to be far more difficult to rear than many of the other targeted marine ornamental fish species under investigation.  More than a decade later, we are finally seeing some exciting progress with rearing this species and will share updates about our work on this site. On Jan 1, 2014 we stocked a 1000L tank with about 40,000 yellow tang eggs. In this rearing attempt we experimented with very high water turn-over rates, and very clean (ultra UV dose) water. As in previous studies, we again used the calanoid copepod, Parvocalanus crassirostris, as our feed. While this was only one tank (we are currently testing these methods again), we immediately noticed far more fish making it through the early larval period than ever before.  We were really excited to see 1000’s of fish making past the first 2-3 weeks and ended up with more than 600 at day 35.  We have since moved the fish to smaller tanks and are investigating potential settlement cues, like photoperiod and substrate. The fish recently crossed day 50 and appear to be looking very close to settlement. We’re observing fairly high mortality during this period of transition, but still have more than 150 fish distributed among our tanks.  We are hoping at least a few make it through, but regardless are very encouraged by this recent progress! With newly obtained support from Rising Tide Conservation and the Hawaii Tourism Authority, we are looking forward to pushing this culture technology forward.  This work will be supported by an HPU graduate student (Emma Forbes) who will introduce herself in a separate post.  Stay tuned for updates from OI and Emma! MORE:Yellow Tang Research at the Oceanic Institute – Making Exciting ProgressMore:

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Reefthreads Podcast #171

reefthreads1 Reefthreads Podcast #171http://cdn.wso.net/reefthreads/podcasts/rt171.mp3 Kelwu’s tank with star-polyp “grass,” shown at the Aquaticlog.com site.New week. New podcast. This week we’re gabbing about dinoflagellates, captive-bred fish, fish quality, Gary’s tank, Diver’s Den, soft-coral pricing, the Tanked TV show, green-star polyp grass, tank preferences, getting advice, and avoiding beginner mistakes. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Christine and Gary More: Reefthreads Podcast #171More:

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Seahorse Canada: Canadian Seahorses At Last!

f085flirty male seahorse Seahorse Canada: Canadian Seahorses At Last!
A flirty pair of seahorses from Seahorse Canada. Canadians have long had trouble getting true captive bred seahorses. CITES has had the unfortunate side effect of restricting access to Captive Bred seahorses to Canada, and while a few overseas companies do ship across the border, it’s a difficult process. No more! Seahorse Canada has recently opened it’s doors, specializing in captive bred seahorses. Their first offering is the Lined Seahorse Hippocampus erectus. H. erectus are considered the hardiest of the seahorses, making this an excellent first offering. This is doubly good news, as many of the tank raised seahorses that make it into Canada tend to species that are more difficult to keep. A beautiful group of Lined Seahorses showing long cirri, the fleshy growths that help them blend into algal environments. And did I mention they’re true More: Seahorse Canada: Canadian Seahorses At Last!More:

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CORAL Video: Frag Swap Set Up with HighDefCorals

 It’s safe to say that HighDefCorals has taken the act of being a “Frag Swap Vendor” to a true art-form; they often have the swankest setup in the room. Gone are the days when vendors at frag swaps were simply hobbyists with a 20 gallon long and a metal halide light; these days frag swapping is serious business. Based in Oklahoma City, OK, Ed and Denise Brookshire, and partner Paul Whitby, dedicate their time to traveling the country to offer “[imported] livestock not found in your LFS.” For companies like HighDefCorals, perhaps we are better off thinking of their mobile setups as the gourmet food trucks of the aquarium industry. Last weekend at the inaugural Reef Currents conference and coral farmers market put on by MARSH, HighDefCorals took the time to film frag swap setup Friday night before the event on Saturday. What resulted is a 2-minute condensed look at the setup of the HighDefCorals display you see may see around your local frag swap or convention. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbvNGfR_s4c They make it look easy, but having been there myself to see the tear down (and to get drenched when a hose came off a high volume water pump that was draining a bucket) there’s a lot to be done even with such a well-thought out and engineered setup. MORE: CORAL Video: Frag Swap Set Up with HighDefCoralsMore:

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Don’t Get Stuck On It, As It Is A Crappy Way To Live

Dulichia rhabdoplastis Featured Image Don’t Get Stuck On It, As It Is A Crappy Way To Live
A Red Sea Urchin of the Northeast Pacific, Strongylocentrotus franciscanus. Of urchins and amphipods and of beauty and bugs Text & Images by Ronald L. Shimek, Ph.D. People who have read more than one of my musings generally are aware I like to discuss things that aren’t what they seem to be. And particularly, I like to discuss things that seem to be very obvious, but actually are more oblivious than obvious.  So putting this all together, I like to discuss interactions that are obviously what they aren’t. A good case in point revolves around the large Red Sea Urchin of the Northeastern Pacific, Strongylocentrotus franciscanus. These are sea urchins that are far larger than the common sea urchins of reef aquaria. MORE: Don’t Get Stuck On It, As It Is A Crappy Way To LiveMore:

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Reef Threads Podcast #170

reefthreads1 Reef Threads Podcast #170http://cdn.wso.net/reefthreads/podcasts/rt170.mp3 Transluscence! It’s time for more reef chit chat. Subjects this week include Christine talking at the Boston Reef Society meeting, accuracy and precision (again), Gary’s soft-coral tank plan, Xenia, Rod’s food, exploring a LFS, painting tank backs, and skimmer performance. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Christine and Gary Painting tank backs When skimmers don’t work The Reef Addicts site More: Reef Threads Podcast #170More:

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