Category Archives: Tanks

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Picture of the Week, Group of Helfrichi Firefish

The helfrichi firefish is often considered to be the most beautiful of the firefish gobies, and we tend to agree with that notion. Of course, being the most beautiful, this fish is highly sought after, with a high price tag to match. That’s why we were blown away by seeing the fish in such a large group in the tanks of a fish wholesaler. One of my personal favorite fish in such large quantities…it was awesome.

Aquatic Experience 2014: The Interviews – Full Coverage Part 2

Aquatic Experience in Chicago was great! There were many awesome show tanks from vendors and in this video I highlight them and some other booths from the show. Enjoy! Brought to you by coralfish12g.

Aquatic Experience 2014: The Interviews – Full Coverage Part 1

Aquatic Experience in Chicago was a blast this year, 2014! There were lots of exhibitors and many made either this or the second video, but these are all the interviews I did at the show. Doug Poindexter- World Pet Association Julian Sprung- Two Little Fishies Kessil Real Reef Solutions COLLAR Doctor Eco Systems Proaquatix PRODIBIO Blue Life I also talk a little about the Aquatic Experience banquet. This is full coverage elf the event by coralfish12g

Reef Threads Podcast #208


A b&w view of Trikentrion flabelliforme.

We’re back! This week we talk about Snorkel Bob’s Hawaii efforts and more beginner tips. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine

Reef Aquarium Carbon Dosing Clarified

The key to success with coral such as Goniopora may be healthy populations of bacteriaCarbon dosing is a relatively new phenomenon in the reef aquarium hobby. The first I heard about it was around two years ago, and I hadn’t given it a whole lot of thought until recently. The goal of carbon dosing is to improve water quality by lowering nitrates and phosphates. Nitrates and phosphates can lead to algae blooms and poor coral health if the levels are too high. Some aquarists have difficulty controlling these levels and it can be a frustrating battle. Carbon dosing lowers these two chemical parameters by providing a food source for bacteria that consume nitrates and phosphates. Then, by removing the bacteria through protein skimming, the aquarist eliminates nitrates and phosphates from the water. It is similar in concept to algae scrubbing, whereby one grows algae to bind up phosphate, nitrate, and heavy metals, and then exports them from the system by periodically harvesting the algae.

Tank Profile: Roy Seine’s Alluring 312-Gallon Reef

When I came across a full-tank shot of this large aquarium, I knew I had to learn more about the system and its owner. Great profiles, large coral colonies, showcase-size specimens, and a clean bare-bottom layout all collaborate to catch the eye of many an aquarist, including myself. So let’s dive in…just try not to splash! The Aquarist An interesting aspect of profiling aquariums that have drawn my gaze is finding out about the hobbyists behind them. Roy Seine, the aquarist responsible for the previously mentioned acrylic box reef, has been keeping marine aquariums since 1990. It’s not surprising to hear he favors small polyp stony (SPS) corals and giant clams, and that appreciation comes through in this salty display. During his two-plus decades in the hobby, Roy has maintained a number of aquariums ranging from 1 gallon all the way up to 500 gallons.

Reef Threads Podcast #207


Gary (right) joins two BRS members to enjoy the delicious fish goo.

We’re excited to bring you yet another Reef Threads podcast. This week’s subjects are our “Where Do You Listen” contest, the St. Jude/Reef Savvy reef system raffle, Boston Reef Society, Gary eating fish goo, Petco buying Drs. Foster and Smith, and beginner tips. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine

St. Jude raffle

You Can Help Discourage the Sale of Hard-to-Keep Marine Species

The Moorish Idol (Zanclus cornutus) is notoriously hard to feed and has a high mortality rate in home aquariaRegular Saltwater Smarts readers might wonder why we often post profiles of fish or invertebrates that are very difficult if not impossible to keep in home aquariums. After all, if we want to discourage you from buying these animals, why on earth do we go to all the trouble of describing them? Well, the answer is simple: because you’re going to encounter them for sale on the marine aquarium market anyway. One of our biggest frustrations as long-time hobbyists is the fact that, for whatever reason, many dealers out there continue to trade in species that have no business in hobbyists’ tanks. It’s wise to be armed with information about these animals so you’re in a better position to make responsible purchases. If you want to help discourage the sale of off-limits livestock, here are some simple steps you can take: Educate yourself In order to recognize animals that don’t belong in the aquarium trade, it helps to do some research on the various species you’re apt to come across when shopping at your LFS or online. That way, you’ll know what to buy and what to avoid so you don’t unwittingly support unsustainable practices with your dollars. The various species profiles posted here at Saltwater Smarts (which are increasing all the time) are a good research starting point.

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