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Bogas Fish Ball

Good morning friends, after photographing the sub yesterday and waving goodbye I swam over to my giant school of Boga’s and joined them for around 15 minutes. These fish are so amazing and always the highlight to any dive! Instead of swimming away in fear they always swim to me then surround me allowing me to join their school. They seem to have no fear of the camera or the flashes thus allowing me to snap away at my leisure, it’s a total blast!

School of Snappers

Good morning friends, it’s finally friday!! I have a beautiful school of snappers for you all today that we found living under a remote pier, or at least what was left of it. I know when most of you hear the word “snapper” your mouth starts watering and you immediately associate this with dinner but for me it means keeping them safe and enjoying the time I spend with them underwater getting to be part of their aqua world for just a few minutes. Most of the time when I find these large groups of fish I just stop and chill in hopes of showing them that I come in peace and just want to take a few photos and most of the time it works. Most diver are in such a rush that they don’t have the time to stop and smell the fish thus scaring them off immediately and I can tell you from experience that chasing fish doesn’t work either, they will win every time!

Reef Threads Podcast #239


Is it smart to quarantine several fish together?

This week’s podcast chit-chat topics are the reef side of Gary’s bicycle trip, collecting wild food, quarantining multiple fish, DC pumps, pipe organ care, and what we’d pay for fish and corals. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine

Sponsor: Rod’s Food
Rod’s Food website

Multi-fish quarantine
Is It Okay to Quarantine Multiple Marine Fish at Once?, Saltwater Smarts

Splash-free surge tanks
Finally, a surge tank without the noise, bubbles, space, or plumbing!, LobsterofJustice, Reef Central

Pipe organ coral
Pipe Organ care, GOSKN5, Reef Central

Paying the most
What’s your max fish price?, 3FordFamily, Reef2Reef

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Juvenile Trumpetfish

Good morning friends, many have written and asked what kind of fish is always floating in front of our LIVE underwater online video camera that we have at 50 feet out in front of our Substation lagoon. Well as you can see from the photo I took on friday it’s a little reddish/brown trumpetfish which has decided this camera is perfect for his new home. When I went out to take the photo he was right in front of the camera lens as you see here with his head down and tail straight up to the sky but as I got closer he drifted behind the camera and stayed there until I was gone. From a distance I watched as he then came back to the exact location and continued to hang there upside down, what a cool little fish. Pretty amazing that this fish can get up to three foot long! For your chance of spotting him just go to…… www.seasubmarine.com Waking up tired today from a long 40 mile mountain bike ride yesterday that I did with three other friends and countless other activities during the day…

Brown Tube Sponge, Agelas conifera

Good morning all, I have a common Curacao reef scene for you today consisting of a wild looking colony of brown tube sponges, Agelas conifera and a little sea bass hiding amongst them.  Sponges are animals of the phylum Porifera (/pɒˈrɪfərə/; meaning “pore bearer”). They are multicellular organisms that have bodies full of pores and channels allowing water to circulate through them, consisting of jelly-like mesohyl sandwiched between two thin layers of cells. Sponges have unspecialized cells that can transform into other types and that often migrate between the main cell layers and the mesohyl in the process. Sponges do not have nervous, digestive or circulatory systems

Smiling Parrotfish

Good morning gang, more weird weather today, the ocean is still a mess and we have overcast skies with little chance for rain and of course lets not forget the never ending winds! We do have another submersible run today which should happen at around 11:15 and your truly will be under the sea taking pictures, you might luck out and see us at the link below…. www.seasubmarine.com I have another fun fish face for you all today that I took a few weeks ago on our Substation house reef. This is a beautiful parrotfish shot during the day at F22 creating the non-distracting black background and lots of great details.

Bottle-nose Dolphin Pod

Hi gang, well we made it through one very busy day yesterday with three sub dives and 12 collage kids from Bonaire, all doing some kind of studies in marine biology. Our ocean is currently super dirty meaning it’s like diving in pea-soup with different species of jellyfish everywhere! We also have had some raging currents flow through here this past week making diving very difficult and I am sure is responsible for much of this cloudy water. For me taking photos of our submersible in this pea-soup nasty water is about as difficult as underwater photography gets and not even Photoshop can this kind of photo look good again.  For my poor neglected dolphin fanatics out there, I have a few fun dolphin facts from our friends at www.sciencekids.com for you all today, read on….

Deepwater Pigments of The Red Sea

Together with an international team of researchers, divers from the University of Southampton, UK, Tel Aviv University and the Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences (IUI), Israel have found a colorful range of pigments in coral more than 50 meters below the surface of Red Sea reefs. Since only blue wavelengths from the sun reach coral at depths past 50 meters, the team was surprised to find specimens exhibiting pigments such as red and yellow. Jörg Wiedenmann, Professor of Biological Oceanography and head of the University of Southampton’s Coral Reef Laboratory, explains: “These fluorescent pigments are proteins. When they are illuminated with blue or ultraviolet light, they give back light of longer wavelengths, such as reds or greens.” 150624143152_1_900x600Dr Cecilia D’Angelo, Senior Research Fellow at Southampton sees a future for coral pigment use in industries such as biomedical adding: “We found, however, that some of the pigments of these corals require violet light to switch from their nascent green color to the red hue of the mature pigment. This is a particularly interesting property to develop markers for advanced microscopic imaging applications. Their optical properties potentially make them important tools for biomedical imaging applications, as their fluorescent glow can be used to highlight living cells or cellular structures of interest under the microscope. They could also be applied to track cancer cells or as tools to screen for new drugs.” Read more here!  … More:

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