Top Stories
Latest Posts

Reef Threads Podcast #229

reefthreads Postmodern Jukebox support for Gary leads off a podcast packed with reef information including clown triggerfish mariculture, Quality Marine’s fish-information QR codes, lionfish eating, Marius Schudel’s (he’s a guy!) Irish rockpool aquarium, and anti-aging nematocysts. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine

Baby/Juvenile Caribbean Reef Squids, Curacao

Good morning one and all, how are you doing out there?? I trust all our mothers out there had a wonderful Mother’s Day?? I heard our friends in the Black Hills of South Dakota got hit with a major snow storm this weekend which is normal for April but in May??? Here in Curacao we have had record-breaking, non-stop hurricane force winds for the past three weeks making life very difficult! Because of these gale-force winds we had to more or less close Dolphin Academy to swimmers the whole week because of Hawaii sized waves rolling in and crashing over the walls and sinking one of our big floating platforms! On top of that, our island has had no rain for months now and everything is bone dry, boy do I miss our rainy season and would do anything to get it back MORE

CMAS Frag Swap 2015


I take a trip to the CMAS, Chicago Marine Aquarium Society Frag Swap. There were a lot of vendors and plenty of people to meet. Marc Levenson was the guest speaker and it was overall a very cool event. MORE

Reefing from Afar, Part 1: The Six “Ps”

There comes a time in every reef fanatic’s life where little things like work and vacation travel get in the way of enjoying the hobby. While being away for just a week, I have gone through everything from little disasters, such as algae blooms, to the horror of losing a whole system. Rather than accept problems as inevitable every time I travel, I’ve set out to automate as much of my system as possible.Allow me to introduce myself! I am by no means a professional aquarist, nor do I make my living in this industry, but as a professional systems engineer, I have applied many of my engineering practices to my reef aquarium, which in my mind feels like a multimillion-dollar system. I have been in the saltwater aquarium hobby for over 25 years. I worked at a local pet store chain growing up and ran its first saltwater system when the base technology encompassed only undergravel filters, wet-dry systems, and air-driven skimmers with wooden air diffusers. Today, technology has advanced quite a bit with respect to filtering methods, lighting, and water chemistry MORE

Friday Rewind

For today’s Friday Rewind, we take a look back at the demonstration video for the CRM-2000 Coral Fragging Robot. These handy dandy robots make propagating Goniopora stutchburyi a breeze!   

Insane Hyper Yellow Hammer

reefs.comCherryHammerIt’s no secret among my reefing peers that I’m a Euphyllia nut. I just love them. The variety of colors, the movement, fairly quick growth… what’s not to love! So yesterday when I stopped by Cherry Corals it was no surprise that they led me straight to check out this stunning yellow wall hammer (Euphyllia ancora). My jaw dropped, my hands started to shake and drool was dosed into the raceway. While it’s not likely to entice all collectors, this piece is certainly unique.    MORE

Sergeant Major Eggs, Abudefduf saxatillis

Good morning friends, the winds here in Curacao are pushing 38 knots this morning, that’s around 43 mph not including the 60 mph wind gusts, not a fun place to be right now! I have two different, very aggressive, male Sergeant Major’s for you all today that I photographed a few days ago guarding their eggs which you can see in the last photo. Sergeant Majors earn their name from their brightly striped sides, known as bars, which are reminiscent of the insignia of a military sergeant major. This is a very common reef fish growing to a maximum size of about 7 inches and found in the 1-40 foot zone. The female will lay her eggs in patches on a firm substrate and the male will guard them vigorously until they hatch. MORE

Sea Apples: Hazardous Holothurians Best Left to Advanced Hobbyists

Sea apples are definitely colorful and exotic-lookingIn several posts here at Saltwater Smarts, I’ve mentioned that certain marine organisms routinely offered in the aquarium trade should come with a warning label—especially for novice hobbyists. In these cases, I’m usually referring to animals that are really gorgeous or exotic-looking (hence hard to resist) but either difficult to keep alive or dangerous to tankmates for one reason or another. In the case of the sea cucumbers known as sea apples (Pseudocolochirus spp.), you get a bit of both worlds in one enticingly beautiful package. What they look likeSea apples have round to ovate bodies that are brightly colored in shades of red, blue, purple, and yellow (or combinations thereof). The oral cavity is fringed with brightly colored, feathery feeding tentacles, and colorful tube feet appear in rows along the body. These holothurians can reach a maximum size of around five to six inches, but they are capable of dramatically deflating if stressed or, if dissatisfied with their placement, inflating in an effort to drift to a more suitable spot. Two different species of sea apples Okay, sea apples sound like really beautiful, fascinating animals, right? MORE


Reefs.com is the world's leading destination for sustainable coral reef farming and the aquarium hobby. We offer a free open forum and reef related news and data to better educate aquarists and further our goals of sustainable reef management.