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BuildMyLED Now Offering Refugium Lighting in Three Different Spectra

7783BuildMyLED Refugium LED BuildMyLED Now Offering Refugium Lighting in Three Different Spectra BuildMyLED, an Austin-based aquarium equipment manufacturer that specializes in custom LED lighting options for marine and freshwater aquariums, recently announced their latest product, LED refugium lighting. In typical BML fashion, the light fixtures are offered up in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, with several different beam angle options, a couple of different colors, and in three different spectra also being available. While LED refugium lighting isn’t anything new, BuildMyLED is doing something that most others don’t. They really did their homework, and have designed three different versions of their lights to each grow a particular type of algae. Instead of just making a single catch all type fixture, which is one of the options, their refugium lights are designed to specifically grow either red or green macroalgae. The Universal Spectrum refugium LED might seem like the best choice on the surface, but today’s hobbyists are finding that certain types of algae perform better than others in their specific systems. In my personal tank, I’ve found that my Dragon’s Tongue algae does far better than Chaetomorpha or Caulerpa, though in another system that is similarly designed the green macroalgae have done better. So, we definitely see significant value in targeting a specific type of algae. The custom refugium lights come in eight different lengths, with the shortest being 12″ and the longest being six feet MORE: BuildMyLED Now Offering Refugium Lighting in Three Different Spectra

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Another update from Aquatronica for its Touch Controller

DSG 2971 Another update from Aquatronica for its Touch Controller

Aquatronica continues unabated development of its products and announced another update to its Touch Screen Controller, version 2.5.

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How to Beat Those Pacific Blue Tang Blues

paracanthurus hepatus 300x169 How to Beat Those Pacific Blue Tang BluesParacanthurus hepatus is commonly referred to by a number of common names including Pacific Blue TangIts common names include the Pacific blue tang, regal tang, hippo tang, palette surgeonfish, yellow-tail blue tang, and probably several others that presently elude me. Kids know it as the addle-brained Dory from Finding Nemo. Whatever common name you apply to it, though, Paracanthurus hepatus is one gorgeous blue fish! Morphologically speaking, P. hepatus is highly laterally compressed (flattened from side to side) and possesses a sharp, retractable spine on each side of the caudal peduncle. It lacks the elongated snout common to so many surgeons, giving its face a somewhat more rounded profile. Color-wise, this surgeon really makes a statement! It’s blue overall with a starkly contrasting bright-yellow tail and a black pattern on its flanks resembling a painter’s palette (hence one of its many common names). More: How to Beat Those Pacific Blue Tang Blues

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LIVE Underwater Video Camera, Substation Curacao

5f2aLive Camera 457x305 LIVE Underwater Video Camera, Substation CuracaoGood morning friends, running late because of multiple dives this morning photographing the submersible but I did manage to get this shot for one of my viewers who asked about our live underwater video camera. As many of you already know we have a LIVE web camera that is always on at around 50 feet right out in front of the Substation. The address is; www.seesubmarine.com and for those of you who don’t remember we have a one hour delay set up so what your seeing was taken an hour ago. There’s a big school of Bonnetmouths or Bogas out there right now and have been here for longer than I can remember, these are the fish in the photo above the camera.  MORE: LIVE Underwater Video Camera, Substation Curacao

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‘The Psychedelic World of Coral Morphologic’

prattflyer web ‘The Psychedelic World of Coral Morphologic’
‘The Psychedelic World of Coral Morphologic’ This Friday, November 15th at 7pm, we are enthusiastic to present ‘The Psychedelic World of Coral Morphologic’ at the Pratt Institute in New York City. The event will be led by Colin Foord, who will introduce the Coral Morphologic ethos, pathos, and logos through a series of short films. Using Google Glass, Jared McKay will then lead the audience on a fluorescent evening-tour of the Coral Morphologic Laboratory and feed the corals in real time from Miami. This will be streamed through a Google Hangout from the Coral Morphologic Google+ page. ‘The Psychedelic World of Coral Morphologic’ is free and open to the public. Tags: Coral Morphologic, Pratt Institute This entry was posted on Monday, November 11th, 2013 at 12:03 pm and is filed under Live. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site. More: ‘The Psychedelic World of Coral Morphologic’

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GRAFTING CORALS: The Art Of Coral Grafting

DSC 0030 GRAFTING CORALS: The Art Of Coral Grafting
The art of coral grafting is very risky. It involves fragging corals, which if you have any knowledge on that know it can come with some dangers. They can contain toxins that could potentially kill someone. With proper safety you can cut any fraggable coral with confidence. Once you become a skilled frag master you can start to experiment with the pieces. Let me clear up the notion that grafting corals is the same as grafting trees. A coral will not be genetically altered, it wont grow weird hybrid polyps, and it wont actually form into the other coral, but put up a diving structure that merely looks like it was grafted. With that said, corals will however morph in color from close contact with other colors of the same species More: GRAFTING CORALS: The Art Of Coral Grafting

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Digital-Reefs Update: Product Releases and Reviews Portal Now Online

productportal Digital Reefs Update: Product Releases and Reviews Portal Now OnlineIn case you hadn’t already noticed, Digital-Reefs is one of the more prolific blogs when it comes to posting news of new reef-related products and services, and of course we also bring you our regular hobbyist-view ‘hands on’ reviews too. Actually, we’ve now accumulated so much material we decided to revamp this side of the site to make this material more visible and accessible. As such, please note that you can now gain direct access to a special portal page which lays out releases and reviews and is grouped intuitively by general product area (and the original chronological list is also available). We’ve also added a drop-down link to the listing under the services menu (along the menu bar under the site header image), and a direct button style link over on the right of the front page. The listing already covers a diverse range of products and is steadily growing as we get more companies interested – so please consider bookmarking the page directly and check back to see how things develop. Finally, if there’s a specific product you’d like to see us test, or indeed if you have a product that you’d like to see included, don’t hesitate to contact us! More: Digital-Reefs Update: Product Releases and Reviews Portal Now Online

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ARMS Project Continued, Smithsonian ARMS Boxes

5678ARMS in Sub 457x304 ARMS Project Continued, Smithsonian ARMS BoxesHi friends, two days ago I wrote to you about the Smithsonian ARMS (Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures) project and many wrote back with some important questions. So I briefly explained to you already about what the boxes are for and how they get them onto the shallow reef but how do we get the rest of them down to 180, 300 and 750 feet?? Well it’s fairly simple, all you need is a two million dollar submersible, a trained crew, a custom made basket and a really cool robotic arm! The top photo shows 3 ARMS boxes/traps loaded up into the front basket and are ready to go, this is all we can take down at one time. Once down to the chosen depth/location one trap at a time is lifted out and set onto the reef and because of the depth there is no need to anchor them down, they should stay where they are placed. Here is a link to the Smithsonian’s site and the ARMS project, and if you have questions let me know and I can ask them directly MORE: ARMS Project Continued, Smithsonian ARMS Boxes

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