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One Tough Goldfish

goldfish-800x351 Here’s a story of feeder goldfish that beat the odds. Seven years ago, at Shima Marineland in Japan, a small goldfish was thrown into a tank, intended as food for a hungry Arapaima. In case you didn’t know it, Arapaima are among the world’s largest freshwater fish, growing over 10 feet long and weighing over 400 pounds. The little goldfish managed to escape the hungry mouth of the Arapaima and ended up in the aquariums filter system. Where it lived for seven years eating detritus and other bits. During a recent filter cleaning, an aquarist was shocked to find the goldfish, now ten inches long, alive and well in the filter. The fish showed no signs of injury, however, it was a little pale, due to the years living in darkness. Now the goldish has turned into a bit of a celebrity and has its own display tank in the aquarium. MORE

Deepwater Coral Reef Discovered off Coast of Ireland

640px-Black_Coral_(Antipathes_sp.)_(6132712705) - Edited
The deep sea biome is said to be less understood and less explored than the Moon. Nearly any serious expedition into deep sea ecosystems reveals new species, or even entirely new habitats. Often, these notoriously slow-growing biological communities are thought to be extraordinary simply on the basis of their size and structural complexity. Such was the case with the discovery of a large, coldwater coral reef off of the Irish coast. While scanning the seafloor along the route of the MORE

Shark Summer

 It is has not been that long since I last wrote about a shark attack incident in North Carolina. Although shark attacks are extremely rare, there have been a steady stream of high profile attacks this summer. On Friday, a North Carolina man was bitten by a shark while swimming with his three children and another adult. They were swimming about a mile north of the Avon pier around noon. While trying to get the children to shore safely, the man was attacked in his leg and lower back. The injuries are not reported to be life threatening. This is the fifth shark attack in North Carolina this summer. MORE

NASA Tests Under Ice Rover At California Science Center Aquairum

BRUIEOn June 24, 2015, NASA tested its Buoyant Rover for Under Ice Exploration (BRUIE) at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. The BRUIE was placed at 24 feet underwater on the bottom of the 188,000 gallon tank. The device was designed at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. The purpose of the rover is to study the Arctic and Antarctica and is meant for travel under the ice shelf of an icy world. MORE

Making Your Own Ice Packs is Cool and Easy

Summer is here and if you ship out a bunch of corals every week like I do, you’re going to need to keep them cool. Ice packs from most shipping supply companies cost anywhere from $1.00 – .50 cents each, that means I used to spend a few hundred dollars per year just on ice packs and you generally only have two size options. I have made ice packs out of gelatin in the past, but I find it to be messy, time consuming, and not vegan friendly. It had been in the back of my mind for awhile to try using water polymer crystals to make ice packs after seeing them used in floral arrangements, so I recently started doing it. 


Water Polymer Crystals after absorbing water

 Water polymer crystals MORE

Coastal Activities Making it Harder for Fish to Breathe

New research out of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University finds that the impacts of human activities like dredging are making it harder for fish to breathe, and are likely increasing the rates of gill disease amongst coastal reef fish. “Fish gills are in direct contact with their environment and are the first line of defense in the animal’s immune response, which makes them the perfect place to look for damage associated with sediment,” adds co-author of the study Dr Jodie Rummer. 150616093642_1_900x600“Suspended sediments result from flood plumes, coastal agricultural and industrial development and from dredging operations and are increasing in coastal waters worldwide,” says co-author, Dr Amelia Wenger. The study simulated sediment accumulation in the lab and subjected clown fish larvae to increased levels, and what they found might be some what of a duality. “The gills in sediment-exposed larval clownfish fish were congested, exhibiting twice as much mucous of what could be found in clean-water exposed fish,” says study lead author, PhD Student Sybille Hess. Yet Rummer added that”Sediment-exposed fish also increased the number of protective cells on their gills, presumably safeguarding the delicate tissue from the damage that sediment particles could cause.” The findings could mean fish are adapting to the elevated levels of sediment but they most definitely underscore the increased need for awareness as it relates to coastal impacts like dredging and agricultural runoff. Read more here.

Laudato Si

Pope Francis waves as he leads his weekly audience in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican August 27, 2014.  REUTERS/Max Rossi  (VATICAN - Tags: RELIGION) - RTR43XCT

Pope Francis waves as he leads his weekly audience in Saint Peter’s Square at the Vatican August 27, 2014. REUTERS/Max Rossi (VATICAN – Tags: RELIGION) – RTR43XCT

 Pope Francis released an environmental encyclical entitled, “Laudato Si.” The title is in central Italian and means, “praise be to you.” This is in fact Pope Francis’ second encyclical, yet the content is getting a lot of attention across the internet, mainstream media and the world. Since Pope Francis’ first encyclical, “Lumen fidei” (Light of Faith) was largely the work of his predecessor Pope Benedict, Laudato Si is being hailed as Francis’ first true encyclical. In it, the pope calls for a re-interpretation of Christian ideals, mainly the belief that having dominion over planet Earth as expressed in Genesis, doesn’t mean having the right to destroy the planet and put third world nations at risk along with much of the planet’s life. MORE

Long Island Collecting Log: The next wave has arrived

Spotfin and tangsLast week I reported on the arrival of the first tropical fishes of the year to appear in Long Island waters after a seining trip at Fire Island inlet turned up a filefish, groupers, and northern sennets. This week I am happy to announce that the next wave has arrived. MORE is the world's leading destination for sustainable coral reef farming and the aquarium hobby. We offer a free open forum and reef related news and data to better educate aquarists and further our goals of sustainable reef management.