Tag Archives: Coral

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Prodibio Launches New Coral Vitamin Supplement

EN FR CoralVits06 300x154 Prodibio Launches New Coral Vitamin Supplement CORAL VITS is a hyper-concentrated solution containing all the vitamins needed for coral growth and for the well-being of fish in saltwater or reef aquarium. Available in Standard,(6,12 and 30 vials) and Pro ranges. 6 vials £14.29 RRP12 vials £22.49 RRP30 vials £35.79 RRPPro 10 vials £86.00 RRP As with all the Prodibio range dosage is simple and the product always remains fresh. CORAL VITS works in synergy with REEF BOOSTER. More: Prodibio Launches New Coral Vitamin SupplementMore:

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Stenopus hispidus: A Look at a Popular Boxer Shrimp

coral banded1 Stenopus hispidus: A Look at a Popular Boxer ShrimpAmong the various ornamental crustaceans available in the marine aquarium trade, one of the most popular and easiest to obtain is Stenopus hispidus, the banded coral shrimp, also known by the common names coral banded shrimp, banded boxer shrimp, barber pole shrimp, and others. This shrimp’s widespread availability and usually very affordable price tag can be attributed to its extensive natural distribution, which includes all tropical seas. Physical traits S. hispidus is white with distinct red bands on its body and third pair of legs, and it sports long, flowing, white antennae. The third pair of legs is also significantly oversized compared to the others (hence the “boxer” appellation) and equipped with somewhat formidable pincers. Maximum length for the species is around 4 inches (not counting the antennae), though most specimens won’t reach that appreciable size in the aquarium. More: Stenopus hispidus: A Look at a Popular Boxer ShrimpMore:

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Having Crabs is a Good Thing for Coral

Smithsonian scientist Seabird McKeon, along with the museum’s predoctoral fellow Jenna Moore of the Florida Museum of Natural History, have published new research highlighting the importance of reef diversity and how symbiotic crabs can help defend against coral predators. “We found that diversity in both species and size of coral guard-crabs is needed to adequately fend off coral predators,” said McKeon. “It is an example of how biodiversity is crucial to conserving reef environments and the essential resources they provide for thousands of species, including humans.” coral crab 300x275 Having Crabs is a Good Thing for CoralSymbiotic relationships like those between an acropora crab and its colony are something we as hobbyists are well aware of, yet our opinions on the benefits between host and guest in a captive enviroment remain divided. This research shows just how important the relationships are to a natural environment, with Moore adding: “Seemingly small differences among crabs guarding their coral homes can have big effects on coral survival. “Not only does the level of protection provided vary by species, but the smallest crabs were defending the coral from coral-eating snails, a threat that larger crabs ignored.” Read more here!… More:

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Spiral Grafting

photo 21 293x300 Spiral GraftingMy most recent spiral graft is part art project, part science experiment, and involves a genus that I have had great success with in the past, Acanthastrea. I used two corals that originally came from the same mother colony; over the span of two years, one line of clones took on a remarkably different coloration. One set of clones was kept in the aquaculture system connected to Joe Yaiullo’s 20,000 gallon reef tank. The other set was kept in the ReefGen aquaculture on the other side of the aquarium. Both systems receive the same original make up water but have different coral and fish populations, as well as different lighting (T5 vs LED). I have made numerous grafts of various sorts of the years. Not all grafts take, but those that do produce stunning results. I knew that these two lines would indeed fuse since they are clones, but I was curious to see how they would influence each other’s color after such a long period of separation in different conditions.… More:

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Reef Threads Podcast #199

reefthreads1 Reef Threads Podcast #199

Ret Talbot is our guest this week to talk about issues that affect the future of our hobby.Ret Talbot joins us this week to discuss endangered and threatened marine species, recent National Marine Fisheries Service regulation activities, and what all of this means for marine-aquarium hobbyists. This is an important subject that could affect the future of this hobby. We also encourage you to support PIJAC’s efforts to collaborate with regulation authorities. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine More: Reef Threads Podcast #199

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Fused Montastrea in Belize

14 300x200 Fused Montastrea in Belize

Close up of shared polyp between two colonies.

 I was recently going through pictures from my exploratory trip to Belize earlier this year. I was especially interested in coral that were growing in close contact with one another, and I took many pictures and videos of coral interactions. A relationship that struck me as particularly interesting was one between two colonies of Montastrea growing side by side. There was a streak of color in one colony leading from one coral to the other across the area where the two colonies met. I zoomed up with my camera and discovered that one of the polyps was shared by both colonies. I have seen this happen with many of my Acanthastrea echinata grafts (another coral species with high Thrausto counts), where only one area or polyp will fuse while the rest of the graft remains separated. I speculate that there is a regulation between the two corals’ immune systems, only at that location, aided by the presence of similar populations of Thraustochytridsymbionts. The white paper “Identification of a protist-coral association and its possible ecological role” by a team of scientists in Israel, (http://www.int-res.com/articles/meps2006/317/m317p067.pdf ) expounds on this idea. The article has several pictures that show the colored striations of Thrausto populations in several coral species. Enjoy this video of photos I took in Belize of the coral, starting close and zooming out from the shared polyp between the two colonies: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dt3DCCCWUUMore:
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Keeping the Magic Alive, Cyphastrea Combos

photo 1 1 1024x768 Keeping the Magic Alive, Cyphastrea Combos

Long term stable combo of Seriatopora and Cyphastrea

 I love Cyphastrea; it is a beautiful coral, and one that I have had great success with, but one day I realized that I had been growing it for so long that the excitement was gone.  I didn’t want to stop my work with one of my favorite corals, but I knew I had to make a change. There was only one solution for me – give it a hat of SPS! I am fascinated with coral interactions, from complete fusion of soft tissue to understanding long term competition and overgrowth. Sometimes, the success or failure of the experiment is size dependent, other times, food availability or water flow are the most important factors. Over the past few years, I have enjoyed replicating certain… More:
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Coral Growth Plummets on GBR

A recent study has documented a historical decline in coral growth on the Great Barrier Reef of Australia. A team led by Carnegie’s Ken Caldeira compared measurements of the rate of calcification on a segment of the GBR called Bird Island between 1975 and 1979 to those made at a neighboring Island in 2008 and 2009. The team found that the rates of calcification were 40 percent lower during the 2008-2009 period than in the 1975-1979 period. 140917121225 large 300x199 Coral Growth Plummets on GBR“Coral reefs are getting hammered,” said Caldeira. “Ocean acidification, global warming, coastal pollution, and overfishing are all damaging coral reefs. Coral reefs have been around for millions of years, but are likely to become a thing of the past unless we start running our economy as if the sea and sky matters to us very soon.” Read more here.… More:

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