Tag Archives: Coral

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Grooved Brain Coral, Diploria labyrinthiformis

Good morning friends, I’m off to a late start, had to do a quick dive to check a leaking housing that will now have to be sent off for repair. I have a drop dead beautiful colony of Grooved Brain Coral for you all today just sitting all by itself on a sandy plateau with no other corals in sight! These have to be some of the coolest looking corals on the planet, they can be found in the 3-135 foot range and can grow to be about four feet wide, this one here was about three. Grooved Brain coral colonies are known for forming beautiful hemispherical heads just like you see above. They have deep, often narrow, polyp bearing valleys that are separated by broad ridges with wide conspicuous trough-like grooves.

Aiptasia-X Kill Compilation

http://www.redseafish.com/reef-care-program/aiptasia-x/ In this CoralFish12g video I will review, and demonstrate Aiptasia-X by Red Sea. Within minutes of ingesting the Aiptasia-X the anemone will implode, eradicating both the anemone and planulas. This is the ultimate solution for getting rid of these pesky pests.

Pillar Corals, Dendrogyra cylindrus, Stony corals

Good morning from wet Curacao! Yes, we are finally getting rain and it is great! I have a beautiful little colony of Pillar Corals, Dendrogyra cylindrus for you all today that I found last year at my favorite dive site on the island, Whatamulla which is located near the western tip of the island and is only accessible by boat. These spectacular “pillar-like” stony corals grown straight up and can reach a length of about 10 feet, that’s a tall coral! I normally see these in the 35-50 foot range but they can be found as deep as 65 foot and as shallow as 4, that’s quite a difference in depth. Pillar coral (Dendrogyra cylindricus) is a hard coral or stony coral (order Scleractinia) found in the western Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea

Study Shows Corals Consume Microplastics

640px-Acropora_coral_ffs
Unfortunately, the solid plastic trash we often see in the ocean (bottles, bags, etc.) is only a portion of the plastic waste that has been deposited there. A considerable amount of waste may be present in the form of microplastic. Microplastics are basically miniscule bits of plastic that can be suspended in the water column. Though the environmental effects of microplastic pollution are not yet well understood, the consensus among marine biologists is that they pose a global threat to marine ecosystems. Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University set out to see if corals (which are non-selective filter feeders) ingested microplastics. Corals from a clean area were placed in a contaminated area. After two nights, they were analyzed for the concentrations of plastics. Results indicated that the corals consumed plastic at a rate only a little lower than that of their natural planktonic food. Plastic materials were found engulfed in digestive tissue, suggesting that it may hinder a coral’s ability to digest its food. The team is now investigating what… More:

Mocha Frostbite + RARE Clownfish – Clownfish Depot

In this CoralFish12g video I feature Clownfish Depot's rare clownfish. They have mocha frostbites, picasso breeding pairs, helmet head picassos, and other rare clownfish! Go to their facebook page to contact them about purchasing: https://www.facebook.com/ClownfishDepot

Offer: Free Coral Foods With Red Sea Coral Pro Salt

Red Sea are inviting you to take advantage of a fantastic offer to purchase their Coral Pro Salt for a special price of only £55 and get Reef Energy A&B Coral Foods FREE (mrrp £16.95).The offer is available from selected Red Sea Dealers, and only while stocks last. Click the graphic for further detail.

Reef Threads Podcast #216


Image shown in the Miami Herald article, provided by Waterkeepers, of coral covered in silt.

We return, yet again, to talk about reef-aquarium-hobby stuff. Our subjects this week include our new sponsor Rod’s Food, Miami dredging, restoring Florida reefs, and Christine’s photos and her new light fixture. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine

Sponsor: Rod’s Food
Rod’s Food website

Florida dredging
Biscayne Bay coral at risk from sloppy dredge work, Jenny Staletovich, Miami Herald

Fast coral growth?
Scientists try to regrow a dying coral reef 25 times faster than nature, PBS Newshour, Hari Sreenvisan

Christine’s Light Fixture
Maxspect Razor light fixture

Write-Up Wednesday: Halloween Leptoseris

Combining a striking orange body and yellow-green eyes, the Halloween Lepto delights anyone who looks upon this SPS coral. Besides the unique color combination, the halloween Lepto also grows in an ridged encrusting pattern that makes it even more of an eye-catcher.

My frag of Halloween Lepto

Unlike other high-end SPS that are known to be delicate, the Halloween Lepto is an easy keeper requiring only moderate light and moderate to low flow. My frag of Halloween Lepto shown in the photo thrived under only four T5 bulbs at the bottom of a 21” deep tank. I’ve also found the coral to be very forgiving as it spent three days upside down after it got knocked off a rock. The coral has also recovered from multiple chemical attacks from neighboring corals.

Rounding out the reasons why the Halloween Lepto is a must-have coral is the fact that specimens are nearly all aquacultured. Extensive aqua culturing have driven down the price of the coral from over $100 USD a frag to under $50 USD. I love my Halloween Lepto and haven’t met anyone who doesn’t love their specimens as well.

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