Tag Archives: Coral

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Mocha Frostbite + RARE Clownfish – Clownfish Depot

In this CoralFish12g video I feature Clownfish Depot's rare clownfish. They have mocha frostbites, picasso breeding pairs, helmet head picassos, and other rare clownfish! Go to their facebook page to contact them about purchasing: https://www.facebook.com/ClownfishDepot

Offer: Free Coral Foods With Red Sea Coral Pro Salt

Red Sea are inviting you to take advantage of a fantastic offer to purchase their Coral Pro Salt for a special price of only £55 and get Reef Energy A&B Coral Foods FREE (mrrp £16.95).The offer is available from selected Red Sea Dealers, and only while stocks last. Click the graphic for further detail.

Reef Threads Podcast #216


Image shown in the Miami Herald article, provided by Waterkeepers, of coral covered in silt.

We return, yet again, to talk about reef-aquarium-hobby stuff. Our subjects this week include our new sponsor Rod’s Food, Miami dredging, restoring Florida reefs, and Christine’s photos and her new light fixture. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine

Sponsor: Rod’s Food
Rod’s Food website

Florida dredging
Biscayne Bay coral at risk from sloppy dredge work, Jenny Staletovich, Miami Herald

Fast coral growth?
Scientists try to regrow a dying coral reef 25 times faster than nature, PBS Newshour, Hari Sreenvisan

Christine’s Light Fixture
Maxspect Razor light fixture

Write-Up Wednesday: Halloween Leptoseris

Combining a striking orange body and yellow-green eyes, the Halloween Lepto delights anyone who looks upon this SPS coral. Besides the unique color combination, the halloween Lepto also grows in an ridged encrusting pattern that makes it even more of an eye-catcher.

My frag of Halloween Lepto

Unlike other high-end SPS that are known to be delicate, the Halloween Lepto is an easy keeper requiring only moderate light and moderate to low flow. My frag of Halloween Lepto shown in the photo thrived under only four T5 bulbs at the bottom of a 21” deep tank. I’ve also found the coral to be very forgiving as it spent three days upside down after it got knocked off a rock. The coral has also recovered from multiple chemical attacks from neighboring corals.

Rounding out the reasons why the Halloween Lepto is a must-have coral is the fact that specimens are nearly all aquacultured. Extensive aqua culturing have driven down the price of the coral from over $100 USD a frag to under $50 USD. I love my Halloween Lepto and haven’t met anyone who doesn’t love their specimens as well.

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Toledo Zoo Aquarium Renovation—Update 14: Fish Start to Arrive, Grand Reopening Set for March 27

Salties who have been following our updates on the Toledo Zoo Aquarium renovation these last few years will be excited to hear that the ambitious, $25.5 million project will soon be coming to fruition. Read on for the very latest from our friends at the Toledo Zoo.An epaulette shark gets accustomed to its new digs in the touch tank The Zoo’s innovative new Aquarium experience is slated to open on March 27 with incredible aquatic experiences like nothing else in the region. The Aquarium closed in October, 2012, for major renovations. Now that renovation of this historic Works Progress Administration (WPA)-era structure is complete, animals are starting to arrive, with key arrivals in the touch tanks and the Pacific Coral Reef exhibit. Epaulette sharks and southern stingrays are adjusting to the new quarters of their spacious touch tank, a dynamic encounter that brings visitors close to these amazing animals. Nearby, the first tropical reef fish have been introduced to the Pacific Coral Reef exhibit, a huge 90,000-gallon exhibit that will feature sleek sharks and Zoo divers who interact directly with visitors. This is the largest exhibit in the new Aquarium. Other animals will continue to arrive at the Aquarium and “graduate” to new exhibits after completing their quarantine requirements.

Aging Bony Fish

Pair of otoliths.

Pair of otoliths.

When conducting studies, many ecologists are posed with the question: How old is this fish? Because size is rarely a fair indication of age, the use of a more precise method is often required. The most prevalent method of aging bony fish is known as Otolith Analysis. This procedure entails the extraction and microscope analysis of the fish’s otoliths – small calcium carbonate structures that are located slightly posterior to the fish’s eyes. 
An otolith with visible annuli.

An otolith with visible annuli.

 These structures, which are used as gravity, balance, and movement indicators, grow continuously throughout a fish’s life and exhibit a unique growth pattern. This growth pattern is thought to be a result of seasonal temperature changes – during the winter, the otoliths grow slowly, accreting lightly-colored calcium carbonate; during the summer, the otoliths grow quickly, accreting darker calcium carbonate. The contrast between lighter calcium carbonate and darker calcium carbonate forms rings known as annuli. Since each annuli represents one year, scientists may determine the age of the fish by counting them.… More:

Cold Water Coral Fusion Documented for First Time

For the first time ever researchers from Scotland and Germany have documented fusion of coral skeletons in cold water coral known as Lophelia pertusa. “Normally it is very hard to see where one coral ends and another begins. But on our dives with JAGO, we were able to find reefs where orange and white types of the coral fused together,” says Dr. Sebastian Hennige of the Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh. “Coming from a tropical coral research background, seeing coral fusing like this instantly grabbed my attention, so we were able to successfully sample some corals for genetic and skeletal tests to prove that fusion happens between different individuals,” added Dr. Hennige. 141030102852-largeThrough analysis the team was able to determine that this particular type of coral can recognize itself on a species level, fusing together to form the reef, as opposed to batteling for territory like their tropical counterparts. The response of fusion is counterintuitive to what researchers know about tropical species of coral that behave much more aggressively towards invading colonies. “Cold-water corals build their reefs in the dark and are not supported like this. But they seem to have found another way to attain stability,” explains Dr. Armin Form, a marine biologist at GEOMAR and co-author of the paper. “Either the corals actually fuse and form a joint stock, or a branch grows over another one without interference.” Dr. Form: “Given this plasticity [of Lophelia pertusa], we hope that the coral will be able to cope with future climate changes. But we are not sure if they can keep track with the rapid environmental changes we are already experiencing.” Read more here!More:

Reef Building Corals Responding to Acidification

An international team led by the James Cook University CoralCoE has provided some promising news for corals dealing with rising levels of acidification. “Our aim was to explore the effect of a more acidic ocean on every gene in the coral genome,” adds lead author Dr Aurelie Moya, a molecular ecologist with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook. Staghorn corals are known to be the number one reef building species of reefs worldwide and researchers gathered fragments of wild colonies collected from the Great Barrier Reef of Australia and subjected them to elevated levels of Co2 in the lab.141203111222-large “We found that, whereas 3 days of exposure to high CO2 disrupts formation of the coral skeleton, within nine days the baby corals had re-adjusted their gene expression to pre-exposure levels. Longer exposure seems to be less detrimental to coral health than we had assumed based on shorter-term studies,” states Dr Aurelie Moya, a molecular ecologist with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook. “We saw that within a few days juvenile coral adapted to CO2 levels double those experienced today with no obvious disruption to its life processes,” adds study co-author, Professor David Miller, who heads up the molecular biology group at CoralCoE. Read more here!

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