Tag Archives: corals

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3 Saltwater Fish Beginners Should AVOID!

My FB Page: https://www.facebook.com/coralfish12g http://reefertees.com/ In this CoralFish12g video I am going to be giving you 3 saltwater fish you should totally avoid when first getting into the a

Shipping Live Corals

Shipping Live Corals Shipping corals is one of the main challenges of operating an online-based business. Corals by their very nature are fragile, and shipping them across the country is a highly stressful event.... From: Tidal Gardens Inc. Views: 0 0 ratingsTime: 05:52 More in Pets & Animals

Insane Rainbow-ed Out Dr. Evil Favia at Sexy Corals

Feast your eyes on this, the holy grail of favias. This stunning piece from Sexy Corals, called the Dr. Evil Favia, has every color imagineable. We spy green, blue, orange, red, purple, and even yellow. I don’t think I’ve seen a more true rainbow coral than this.

My, How Your Colors Have Changed

We’ve all heard of corals morphing under different lighting. That piece that looks great in your buddy’s tank looks dull and washed out in yours. Or, you get that coral that does a complete 180. You see it at the store and it looks good, but once established in your aquarium, it turns into a gem. Well, we as a community do talk about coral color changes quite a bit, and we think we have found one of the most extreme examples of such an event

How To Pick Your First Seahorse: 12 Common Seahorse Species Explored

Any number of species of seahorses can be suitable for the right aquarium. Left to right: Hippocampus erectus, Hippocampus barbouri, Hippocampus reidi I’m often asked which species of seahorse aquarists should get for their first aquarium. This question may sound simple enough, but different species behave differently and have varying levels of care required. I’ve put together a list of the most commonly available species, their difficulty level and some additional notes.

Problem Starfish ‘Smell The Fear’

Thought to be responsible for 40 per cent of coral cover loss in the past 30 years, the Crown-of-Thorns Starfish is without a doubt one of the main threats facing the Great Barrier Reef. But now scientists may have discovered a new way to repel them using the scent of their natural nemesis, the Triton Sea Snail. With one whiff enough to send the starfish running (or should that be crawling?) for its life, University of the Sunshine Coast senior lecturer Scott Cummins explains the Triton Snail is one of its most feared natural predators. “We put [the snail] next to the crown-of-thorns starfish and they reacted quite obviously,” he said. “They started to run away, which is quite an important finding because it tells us they do have very poor eyesight, they are sensing or smelling their main predator.” All that remains is for the team to successfully isolate and synthesise the molecule and then Cummins says this sort of repellent could be used to push the starfish off the reef and into areas where they could be destroyed. “We want to narrow it down to exactly what the molecule is then hopefully we can take that and put it into some slow release system on the reef.” More HERE

The Flame Hawkfish: a Vision in Red

A flame hawkfish (Neocirrhites armatus) perched on rocks while keeping an eye on the aquariumI’ve long been a fan of the hawkfishes, and many a specimen has graced my various tanks over the years—most often the readily available and affordable (for me) Falco’s hawkfish (Cirrhitichthys falco). But another hawk that I’ve always found particularly endearing is Neocirrhites armatus, the flame hawkfish. Hobbyists looking for an eye-catching splash of color in a fairly small, hardy fish can’t go wrong with this species—though be warned that it can cost as much as three times what you might fork over for C. falco. Physical traits Looking like a little football (American-style) with fins, this bottom-dwelling species is bright red overall with black shading along the base of its dorsal fin and around the eyes. Unfortunately, this intense red is prone to fading in captivity. Typical of hawkfish, N

Patter of Tiny Tentacles Heard at Mote Aquarium, Florida

Baby Caribbean pygmy octopus born at Mote Marine Lab. Credit Mote Marine LabHaving already hit the spotlight earlier this year, the Caribbean Pygmy Octopuses of the Mote Aquarium in Florida are in the limelight again – but this time they aren’t the babies, rather they’ve gone on to become proud parents. Previously shown in an image dubbed one of the “most amazing science and technology images of the year”, the aquariums Octopus mercatoris are nocturnal and secretive in the wild, and experts at blending into the reefs and rocky outcroppings they inhabit. As such, it’s perhaps no surprise that the 20 new babies from the one mated pair are currently hiding behind the scenes, too delicate and secretive to be on exhibit.

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