Tag Archives: Equipment

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Avoid These 5 Live Rock Aquascaping Pitfalls

Doing your aquascaping correctly from the beginning will help avoid hassles in the futureYour long-anticipated live rock shipment has finally arrived at your doorstep, and you can’t wait to get it in your tank and start watching as life emerges from those gnarly chunks. Though you’re understandably eager to forge ahead putting the rocks in place, it’s critical at this stage to give more than passing thought to how you should arrange them. Inappropriate aquascaping now can lead to major headaches—or at least less-than-satisfactory results—down the road. Here are five live rock aquascaping pitfalls you should take pains to avoid:1. Placing your rock structure atop the “shifting sands” If your system will include a substrate of any significant depth, the first layer of rocks should be placed either right on the tank bottom (or a thin cushioning layer of substrate) or atop some type of secure supportive structure (e.g., pilings constructed of PVC pipe, a framework of egg crate material, etc.). If placed directly on top of a deeper substrate, the rockwork can be easily undermined by burrowing/digging/tail-fanning fish or inverts, potentially resulting in a catastrophic rockslide. 2

Review: Red Sea REEFER 170 rimless braceless aquarium system

If you’ve been following the blog you may know that in January we were lucky enough to obtain the very first of Red Sea’s REEFER range in the form of a white 170 model. Now we have had the tank running as our second test system for several weeks, we are pleased to bring you our detailed operational assessment of the system. Starting with the display tank, our initial high praise seems fully justified as the quality of this aquarium’s construction has proved to be a talking point more than once. The finish is superb and the high clarity glass used on this aquarium not only looks good from a design standpoint, but also gives a crystal clear view of what’s in the aquarium (initial photography efforts also confirm this). We’ve had no leaks, but given that each tank is tested before it leaves the factory, we wouldn’t seriously expect this

Reefing from Afar, Part 4: The Wong Solution

The last article discussed some of the quick and simple ways to take care of your reef while being away for just a short period of time. Due to my work responsibilities, which require travel around the world for two- to three-week periods at a time, I need as much automation as possible and confidence in the solutions I choose.Here’s a high level overview of my system. I currently have a 365-gallon system made up of three display tanks (125 reef ready, 90 reef ready, 80 reef ready rimless), a 40 breeder refugium, and an All-Glass Megaflow 4 sump. Goals I have been in the hobby for over 25 years, and starting in 2006, I decided I wanted to tackle hard corals more. I worked in an LFS growing up and read every book that existed at the time. Before long, I realized it is very difficult to have a truly successful “mixed” reef and to satisfy every requirement for softies, LPS, SPS, and fish all in a single tank.

Neptune Systems Par Monitoring Kit

neptune systems PMK
Neptune Systems is pleased to announce that it will begin shipping its new Par Monitoring Kit, priced at $299.95, to North America next month. For more information, go to: https://www.neptunesystems.com/pmk/More:

Write-Up Wednesday: Top-Down Viewers

I’ve got a strong hunch that you setup a saltwater tank to stock it with beautiful inhabitants for your viewing pleasure. I’m also got a strong hunch that 99% of the time, you view those inhabitants from the side -i.e. through your tank’s side panels. I’ll make one more hypothesis – as your corals start growing, you really, really would like to take some great photos of them.

Here’s some insider information for you – corals always look much better when viewed from the top down. Therefore, if you want some great photos of your corals, try taking them from above. But how do you do that without getting your camera wet?

The answer: the top-down viewer for cameras

Avast Marine Work’s Top-Down Porthole

Top-down viewers that are built for cameras give you an easy and safe way to keep your camera dry, while giving you access to stunning top-down shots. The way they work is simple. A water proof sleeve goes around your camera’s lens. The top-down viewer is secured to the camera’s lens through set screws and the viewer is rotated to zoom in or out to get closer to the subject matter. Note that the focus ring isn’t accessible when the viewer is attached to the camera so auto focus has to be enabled.

While most top-down viewers are meant for cameras with detachable lenses, there are versions available for smart phones like Avast Marine Work’s Smartphone Top-Down Porthole

If you’re using a DSLR/SLR camera or a smart phone, a top-down viewer gives you stunning photos of a completely new way to view your livestock. Corals display different colors and clams especially can look dramatically different when viewed from the top down.

Compare these photos of an acan colony.  The side photo shows mostly red and a hint of orange/yellow:

Here’s the same colony viewed from the top. Notice how the orange/yellow band jumps out in this photo. Plus the coral now looks more orange vs. deep red:

Checkout this photo of a clam taken from the side:

Here’s a top down photo of the same clam:

It looks like a completely different clam, yet it is the same specimen.

Top-down viewing of your tank opens up a whole new world that makes for some great eye candy. And for your FOWLR types, don’t worry, even your fish look different when viewed from the top-down.

(Special thanks to Josh at Murfreesboro Aquatics for the photos)

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Salt Speak – Episode 3: Coldwater Marine Aquariums

Alright, alright…I’m back with another episode of Salt Speak! In this third installment I sat down to talk coldwater marine systems with Stu Wobbe. Stu is the owner of Coldwater Marine Aquatics in Oregon, USA.In the first half of our chat we speak about temperate and coldwater marine aquariums. We dig into equipment and maintenance requirements and how they differ from tropical systems. In addition, Stu introduces us to some of the interesting fish and invertebrate species that are available to coldwater hobbyists. Then we change gears to focus on his business, Coldwater Marine Aquatics, including how they got started (hint: a hand-written note started it all!). CMA is permitted through Oregon for commercial collection and they also use self-imposed restrictions to lessen their impact on the natural environment. Since coldwater systems aren’t as mainstream, we spend time at the end of our chat to focus on a variety of resources available to hobbyists interested in learning more

Reef Threads Podcast #229


One of the animals in Marius Schudel’s Irish rockpool aquarium.

Postmodern Jukebox support for Gary leads off a podcast packed with reef information including clown triggerfish mariculture, Quality Marine’s fish-information QR codes, lionfish eating, Marius Schudel’s (he’s a guy!) Irish rockpool aquarium, and anti-aging nematocysts. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine

Sponsor: Rod’s Food
Rod’s Food website

Prepping lionfish
Three videos about how to prepare lionfish for eating:
Video 1
Video 2
Video 3

Irish rockpool aquarium
Marius Schudel’s rockpool aquarium
Video of Marius Schudel’s Irish rockpool aquarium

Anti-aging nematocysts
Sea Anemone Delivery of Collagen and γ-PGA for Anti-Aging Benefits, Tal, Danon, Toren, Khaiat, Cosmetics and Toiletries magazine.

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Reefing from Afar, Part 1: The Six “Ps”

There comes a time in every reef fanatic’s life where little things like work and vacation travel get in the way of enjoying the hobby. While being away for just a week, I have gone through everything from little disasters, such as algae blooms, to the horror of losing a whole system. Rather than accept problems as inevitable every time I travel, I’ve set out to automate as much of my system as possible.Allow me to introduce myself! I am by no means a professional aquarist, nor do I make my living in this industry, but as a professional systems engineer, I have applied many of my engineering practices to my reef aquarium, which in my mind feels like a multimillion-dollar system. I have been in the saltwater aquarium hobby for over 25 years. I worked at a local pet store chain growing up and ran its first saltwater system when the base technology encompassed only undergravel filters, wet-dry systems, and air-driven skimmers with wooden air diffusers. Today, technology has advanced quite a bit with respect to filtering methods, lighting, and water chemistry

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