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Reef Threads Podcast #201

reefthreads1 Reef Threads Podcast #201 We didn’t quit at 200. We’re back for more. This week we talk about equipment redundancy and backups, pyrosomes, comb jellies, refugiums, and buying animals online. Don’t forget to go to our Facebook page and tell us how you listen to the podcasts. The standout entry will win a free Coral magazine subscription. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine More: Reef Threads Podcast #201More:

Posted in Corals, Equipment, Fish, MACNA, Opinion, Photography, Podcast, Science, Tanks, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Mr. Saltwater Tank’s Coverage of MACNA 2014 Part 3

In this episode of my MACNA 2014 coverage, I talk to EcoTech Marine, Real Reef Rock and Dr. Tim’s Aquatics.  MORE: Mr. Saltwater Tank’s Coverage of MACNA 2014 Part 3More:

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A Brief History of EcoTech Marine Video

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Picasso Triggerfish: A Marine Aquarium Masterpiece

picasso1 Picasso Triggerfish: A Marine Aquarium MasterpieceCertain fishes available in the marine aquarium trade are truly bizarre in their coloration and patterning. Ranked high among them when it comes to both exotic appearance and aquarium adaptability is Rhinecanthus aculeatus, better known as the Picasso triggerfish or the Humuhumu triggerfish. This latter appellation (which is also applied to the closely related and similar looking R. rectangulus) is derived from the Hawaiian name for the species: Humuhumu nukunuku apua’a, which, if memory serves, translates loosely into “Man, how many Mai Tais did I pack away last night!?” I could be wrong on that. Physical traits R. aculeatus exhibits “typical” triggerfish morphology, with a highly laterally compressed body; high-set, independently moving eyes positioned far back on the head; a deceptively small, forward-set mouth; and a stout first dorsal spine that can be “locked” in an upright position to secure the trigger in a reef crevice when the fish is threatened. The maximum recorded length for this species is around 10 inches. I could try to describe the color and patterning of R. aculeatus, but it wouldn’t do this fish justice More: Picasso Triggerfish: A Marine Aquarium MasterpieceMore:

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Pipefish For The Reef Aquarium: Part Two, Husbandry

0627hys instinalis Scribbled Pipefish 2 Aaron Down Pipefish For The Reef Aquarium: Part Two, Husbandry

Scribbled Dragonface Pipefish Corythoichthys instinalis Photo courtesy of Aaron Down

 Now that we’ve discussed which pipefish are appropriate for the reef aquarium in Pipefish For The Reef Aquarium: Part One, The Pipefish, we can look at acquiring and caring for your pipefish. Picking Your Pipefish When purchasing pipefish, there are a few things you can look out for to ensure you get healthy pipefish. Pipefish are susceptible to bacterial infections, so look for areas of cloudy skin, fins or eyes. Rapid breathing is frequently a sign of distress; although it can be situational i.e. fear from recent acclimation, or it can be a sign of a bigger problem such as parasites or bacterial infection. Flagtail Pipefish should be swimming above the substrate, not resting on the bottom. More: Pipefish For The Reef Aquarium: Part Two, HusbandryMore:
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Mutant White Yellow Tang Shows Up at Pacific Island Aquatics

442dWhite Yellow Tang Mutant White Yellow Tang Shows Up at Pacific Island AquaticsHere’s a totally awesome fish. Pacific Island Aquatics recently showed off this amazing aberrant yellow tang, which sports a large amount of white coloration instead of the normal solid yellow we’re so accustomed to. According to information posted on Reef2Reef, the fish was collected off the south side of Kona and tips the scales at just 4.5″ in length. This is about the average size for yellow tang sold in the aquarium hobby, if not a little bit larger, but it’s one of the smallest aberrant tangs collected. This makes it far more appealing than those huge aberrant tangs we normally see.The tang will be listed at $1500 (originally $2000), but PIA is entertaining reasonable offers. This is a pretty typical price for yellow tangs with this coloration.It should be noted that this is not an albino yellow tang. Rather, it is technically a leucistic yellow tang, meaning it’s simply lacking some of its natural pigmentation. This genetic condition results in the fish exhibiting significant white coloration, and in this case a small amount of yellow on its fins and random patches on its body. MORE: Mutant White Yellow Tang Shows Up at Pacific Island AquaticsMore:

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Mr. Saltwater Tank Friday Am Quick Tip: The Emergency Power From Above

When you lose power, you’ve got a couple of options to get your tank powered up. Here’s one option that requires zero gas and has no carbon footprint.  MORE: Mr. Saltwater Tank Friday Am Quick Tip: The Emergency Power From AboveMore:

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Reef Threads Podcast #197

reefthreads1 Reef Threads Podcast #197

It’s a new week and time for a new podcast. This week we talk about Sanjay’s notification trick, Reefs.com, blogs, the MACNA banquet, Archerfish skill, and skeptical animal selection. Download the podcast here, or subscribe to our podcasts at iTunes. Also, follow us on Twitter at reefthreads.—Gary and Christine More: Reef Threads Podcast #197

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